Sergei Salov, Norwich

CHRISTOPHER SMITH A traditional programme brought in a capacity audience. The skill and taste of Sergei Salov ensured that it went away satisfied after an eloquent reminder of the emotional depths of Romanticism.

CHRISTOPHER SMITH

A traditional programme brought in a capacity audience. The skill and taste of Sergei Salov ensured that it went away satisfied after an eloquent reminder of the emotional depths of Romanticism. The recital was all the better because, though strong-fingered, he was not heavy-handed and kept within a dynamic range appropriate to the Assembly House's Music Room. He knew too how to evoke mood with his general demeanour, without grimaces or excessive body-language.

He began Beethoven's Sonata in A major quite gently, almost as if sharing confidences. This meant that the second movement could provide a contrast without being driven too hard, and the restrained Adagio was given character by the warm tone of a motif in the middle range. More forthright and open-hearted, the finale moved intriguingly from echoes of conventional styles to something more individual.

Chopin's Sonata in B flat minor generally explored a graver mood as it worked its inextricable way to the steady tread of the March. Now associated with public mourning, this music was especially moving because the pianist had a light touch in the delicate patterning of melodies that seemed the expression of a more intimate response. To conclude, three of Chopin's Studies with great fluency.