Review: The Temperance Movement

The Temperance Movement

The Temperance Movement - Credit: Archant

The Temperance Movement's previous tours have seen them labelled by many as the latest Next Big Thing. Now, though, they have secured a spot at the forefront of the UK's rock scene.

The Temperance Movement/The Sheepdogs

Waterfront, Norwich

The Sheepdogs are good enough to have headlined this gig themselves, and in fact this tour is part of a reciprocal arrangement – they topped the bill when these two bands toured The Sheepdogs' native Canada recently.

Their infectious brand of rock and roll opens the evening nicely, and they'll make many friends on this trip to the UK if this set is anything to go by.

The Temperance Movement's previous tours have seen them labelled by many as the latest Next Big Thing. Now, though, they have secured a spot at the forefront of the UK's rock scene, and tonight they give a performance that oozes confidence. They sound like they've been around for years.

It's a shame there aren't a few more souls to see it. Although the Waterfront is full to capacity, the show was moved from its original venue of the UEA – apparently the only venue on the tour that didn't sell out.

Most Read

But in some ways, the slightly more intimate setting suits The Temperance Movement, who are supporting their second full album, White Bear, launched just two days earlier, with the energy transferring itself between band and audience.

Frontman Phil Campbell is like the Duracell Bunny, He's full of beans and does his best throughout the evening to make Mick Jagger look like the shy, retiring type.

Tracks such as Be Lucky, meanwhile, would fit perfectly into a Stones set, while Oh Lorraine, with its catchy guitar riff, and Modern Massacre, with its brilliant chorus, are the pick of the new songs.

A special mention should be made for guitarist Matt White, the replacement for Luke Potashnik. Although he joined the band ahead of a short tour of Sweden, this is only White's second UK gig, but you wouldn't have known.

The 17 songs fly by, with Campbell showing no sign of slowing down, and by the time we get to closing anthem A Pleasant Place I Feel (another new one), the whole room is captivated.

The Temperance Movement are no longer ones for the future. They're for now.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter