Review: Noah and the Whale

Emma LeeThe joy of Latitude is that you never know what's going to happen next. At approximately 7.15pm on the Saturday, I was in the Word Arena, singing along at the top of my voice to a brass band rendition of Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody.Emma Lee

The joy of Latitude is that you never know what's going to happen next. At approximately 7.15pm on the Saturday, I was in the Word Arena, singing along at the top of my voice to a brass band rendition of Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody.

It somehow made sense at the time.

The reworked rock classic was heralding Noah and the Whale's arrival on stage.

Hailing from London, they're part of a movement that's been feted as reinventing folk music.


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And fronted by Charlie Spink, they're Latitude veterans, having been involved in the festival one way or another for the last four years.

Their last live show before they retreat into the studio to record their third album, they pulled out all the stops. This is folk music, but not as you know it. Poppy, quirky, intriguing, and distinctive: the highlight was their big hit from a couple of summers back, Five Years' Time.

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I really want to write that the crowd had a whale of a time, but it would be nice to emerge with some journalistic dignity intact.

Oh, whoops.

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