Pictures You Can Hear, Norwich

DAVID WAKEFIELD The title isn't as daft as it sounds. Alan Titmuss is a photographer who specialises in the arts, but more on jazz than anything else.

DAVID WAKEFIELD

The title isn't as daft as it sounds. Alan Titmuss is a photographer who specialises in the arts, but more on jazz than anything else.

He works in black and white and produces work that is beautifully lit (although it is difficult to work out how he manages it, given that many of his subjects are performing on stage at the time). But then he is a photographer and I am not; all I can say, as a jazz fan, is that his pictures do speak volumes, and it doesn't take a deal of imagination to hear the music, either.

Although many images of the rock and pop world are displayed – Chaka Khan, Tina Turner, BB King, Mark Knopfler, Eric Clapton, Elton John and Prince – it is the jazz images that take the eye.

His love of Miles Davis is obvious, given that Miles occupies the lion's share of the exhibition in the café/bar, pictures taken towards the end of his long career, in 1991.

At the other end of the scale, there are comparatively early shots of a long-time and valued Davis sideman, Dave Holland, and the multi-reed explorer, Jan Garbarek. Other jazz giants are captured perfectly – Sonny Rollins in characteristic hunched pose and legendary drummers Max Roach and Art Blakey.

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But two images caught my eye and made me linger. One was of Gil Evans, possibly the finest jazz arranger who ever drew breath, and responsible for seminal Miles Davis albums like Porgy and Bess.

Taken on his 75th birthday, Evans, with his long white hair, cuts an almost Beethoven-like figure seated at his piano. The other, stark and haunting, was of trumpeter/singer Chet Baker taken, I would guess, not too long before his death. A once handsome face, pinched and thin, was a poignant reminder of a life ravaged by his association with drugs.

t Pictures You Can Hear continues at Norwich Arts Centre until

Norwich Arts Centre until October 11.

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