Norwich Science Festival: Understanding the world with chemistry and biology

Whats going on in his head. Picture: Norwich Science Festival

Whats going on in his head. Picture: Norwich Science Festival - Credit: Norwich Science Festival

Chemistry and biology touches every aspect of life.

Can you believe your brain, Ginny Smith. Picture: Norwich Science Festival

Can you believe your brain, Ginny Smith. Picture: Norwich Science Festival - Credit: Norwich Science Festival

From the things we eat to life-saving medicines, chemists and biologists play a vital role in people's lives.

Sarah Robertson, director of education at the Royal Society of Chemistry, said: 'Chemistry is involved in our lives every day and there's a vast range of jobs and careers open to those who have studied chemistry at any level, with great career opportunities both inside and outside the lab.'

That is why this year's Norwich Science Festival is offering a chance to understand the science behind food and medicine.

'Nobody knows exactly what the jobs of the future will look like,' she added, 'but many of them will be created in chemistry to solve global challenges such as human health, energy and the environment. Chemistry is helping us to cope with increasing pressures on energy, food, water and other scarce natural resources and to live more sustainable.'

Can you believe your brain, Ginny Smith. Picture: Norwich Science Festival

Can you believe your brain, Ginny Smith. Picture: Norwich Science Festival - Credit: Norwich Science Festival


You may also want to watch:


The festival is also offering youngsters the chance to see what working in the biology and chemistry field would be like as some of the region's employers show what it is like to be a scientist.

Tim Green, from sponsors Briar Chemicals, said: 'Our ethos is to explore, inspire and achieve; encouraging all stakeholders to play a part in educating the next generation for scientists.

Most Read

'Briar is passionate about encouraging young people to develop an interest in science and the science festival is a fantastic platform.'

As health treatments become better, jobs in the medical industry increase. The Norwich Science Festival takes us inside the workings of one life-saving piece of equipment, the inhaler, at Biology day.

Kitchen chemistry, Dr Stephen Ashworth. Picture: Norwich Science Festival

Kitchen chemistry, Dr Stephen Ashworth. Picture: Norwich Science Festival - Credit: Norwich Science Festival

Sponsors of Biology Day, Wednesday, October 25, are King's Lynn-based Bespak, a developer and manufacturer of complex medical devices.

Head of product engineering Mark Knowles said: 'As a global supplier of about a third of the world's supply of specialised inhaler components commonly used by asthma and COPD patients, we are very pleased to support this exciting and innovative event.'

'Our team will be presenting the inner workings of a metered dose inhaler and how using such devices correctly is vital to successful treatment.'

Norwich Science Festival logo 2017.

Norwich Science Festival logo 2017. - Credit: Archant

Events not to be missed

Kitchen Chemistry: Second Helpings, Tuesday, October 24, 10.30am-11.30am and 1.30pm-2.30pm, the Forum's auditorium, tickets £3.

The Kitchen Chemist, UEA's Dr Stephen Ashworth, is back at Norwich Science Festival, offering a second helping of amazing experiments you can try at home.

What's Going on in his Head? With James Piercy, Wednesday, October 25, 6.30pm-7.30pm, the Forum's atrium, tickets £8, £6 concessions.

Every three minutes someone in the UK is admitted to hospital with a head injury. James Piercy was involved in a serious road traffic accident in 2011. Now he tells the story of his recovery, and take you on a journey which promises to be funny, shocking and emotional experience.

Can you Believe your Brain? Wednesday, October 25, 3pm-4pm, the Forum's auditorium, tickets £8, £6 concessions.

Science writer and presenter Ginny Smith explores the challenges your brain faces every day.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter