North Norfolk artist takes the lead with exhibition

A Border Terrier and English Pointer admire ‘Drumstick Park’ by Robert Nicol – a park scene that env

A Border Terrier and English Pointer admire ‘Drumstick Park’ by Robert Nicol – a park scene that envisages chicken drumsticks being as dog’s point of reference. Picture: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N - Credit: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N

An artist from Norfolk has been involved in the world's first art exhibition - for dogs.

Border Terrier Bobbie jumps into ‘Dinnertime Dreams’ - an oversized 10ft dog bowl filled to the brim

Border Terrier Bobbie jumps into ‘Dinnertime Dreams’ - an oversized 10ft dog bowl filled to the brim with over 1,000 play balls made to look like dog food. Picture: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N - Credit: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N

Robert Nichol, from Cawston, a graduate of the Glasgow School of Art designed a unique piece of art called 'Drumstick Park' which was inspired by dogs' loves of chicken drumsticks.

He created a colour spectrum that dogs can easily see, using shades of yellows, blues and greys.

The piece of art went on display – at dog eye level – at a gallery on London's Tanner Street in the world's first ever art exhibition for dogs.

The exhibition was commissioned by MORE TH>N Pet Insurance to encourage dog owners to spend more time playing with their pets, while also inspiring them to find new ways to ensure they stay emotionally happy and physically healthy.

‘Cruising Canines’ being enjoyed by a springer spaniel – an open car window simulator where a giant

‘Cruising Canines’ being enjoyed by a springer spaniel – an open car window simulator where a giant fan wafts a dog’s favourite scents (such as raw meat and old shoes) through the air as a trio of dogs pop their heads through the windows of a pop art style car. Picture: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N - Credit: Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N


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Robert's work often plays on the humour and surreal, but this was the first time he had drawn something for dogs.

He collaborated with fellow artist, Dominic Wilcox, who designed a series of interactive artworks for dogs including a piece called 'Cruising Canines'. This simulator recreated the experience of dogs travelling in a car using a 2D car cut-out with windows for a dog to stick their head through.

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A giant fan that enclosed various objects - from steak to old trainers - then blew those tantalising scents across the car for the dogs to enjoy.

The pooch-friendly art exhibition was visited by over 400 dogs.

Robert said: 'I imagine dogs use definitive points in the landscape to help them navigate and search for food and objects of interest. I played with the scale of some of the objects to give them increased importance and a sense of fun.'

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