Live music review: King Creosote at Norwich Open

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt - Credit: Steve Hunt

You could argue it's taken a while for the public at large to warm to Scottish singer-songwriter Kenny Anderson, aka King Creosote.

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt - Credit: Steve Hunt

In a career that has spawned more than 40 albums it's only really the last couple which have brought him to the attention of a larger audience.

As far as I was concerned, for years his was a name I'd grown used to seeing in the album reviews section of my music mag of choice, but I'd never felt compelled to dive in and take a listen.

That changed in 2011 upon the release of the sublime Diamond Mine album, co-created with Jon Hopkins. If you haven't I'd highly recommend you'd check it out.

But it's the latest album, Astronaut Meets Appleman, that has turned me from an ocassional listener to a bona fida follower. It's superb and there's not a duff track on it.

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt - Credit: Steve Hunt


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On Monday night Creosote headed to Norwich for a seated gig in front of 300 or so fellow devotees at Norwich Open.

It's a perfect venue. The ornate surroundings of the former banking hall, fit perfectly with Creosote's melodic styles.

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With a seven-piece supporting band, including strings, a double bass and cello, they can take full advantage of the venue's fantastic acoustics and fully flex their music muscles.

The main set is just songs from the aforementioned new album, which pleases me greatly, may not so much any long-term devotees. They do at least get some other favourites in the encore.

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt

King Creosote at Norwich Open. Photo by Steve Hunt - Credit: Steve Hunt

Highlights include Love Life, Melin Wynt and Surface, one of those that just builds and builds and builds. If you are one of those review readers who likes something to reference a band by, the closest comparison I'd have to their new staff is probably Belle and Sebastian.

As a frontman Creosote, who has in the past had something of a reputation for awkwardness, is funny, warm and eccentric. The city's nearby cathedral has definitely made a positive impression on him.

It's a special gig. Intimate and cosy, best summed up by the tender moment Creosote chooses a member of the crowd to waltz with as his band provides the soundtrack.

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