Keswick Hall Choir, Norwich

CHRISTOPHER SMITH This fine concert at Norwich Cathedral was yet more proof why John Aplin's Keswick Hall Choir has become one of the cultural treasures of the region.

CHRISTOPHER SMITH

This fine concert at Norwich Cathedral was yet more proof why John Aplin's Keswick Hall Choir has become one of the cultural treasures of the region. Whether performing music from the Renaissance or the latest works, the singers impressed with their confidence and commitment. Always making light of technical elaboration as they conveyed the spirit of rich texts.

In a Mass by Victoria a hush for the more intimate moments of the Creed added feeling to theology. Contrasting the Spanish Polyphonist with the challenging style of a contemporary composer was typical of Aplin's imaginative programming. The “Seven Antiphons” by the Estonian composer Arvo Part came across with real urgency, with male voice tone used to particular advantage.

The English accents of Gerald Finzi's Magnificat brought out the character of a setting of the same text from the 16th century by Lassus. Alternating florid solo work with choral chant, his combination of traditions was quite fascinating.

To add yet one more dimension, the Swiss composer Carl Rutti was present. He played two of his own graphic works for organ, and then was able to receive his share of the applause for his complex and thrilling “Missa Angelorum”. Adding the final Mass responses, after the usual “Lamb of God” guaranteed a stirring conclusion.

Most Read

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter