John Brundston's Etchings, Holt

CHRISTOPHER SMITH Calm, clear and quietly but determinedly colourful, John Brundston's landscapes are easily recognisable accounts of the scenes he chooses, often in East Anglia but also in more distant places.

CHRISTOPHER SMITH

Calm, clear and quietly but determinedly colourful, John Brundston's landscapes are easily recognisable accounts of the scenes he chooses, often in East Anglia but also in more distant places. At the same time they are expressions of a delicate artistic personality.

One of the great interests of this attractive show is the opportunity it provides for exploring the extent to which stylisation transforms site into vision. In the River Alwen for instance with its balanced greens and fawns and, even more impressively, in Mumbles Head the view is simplified into an almost abstract pattern of planes. Height is brought out by the tall oblong format in White Cliffs.

Furrows curving towards distant horizons create feelings of space, and a loose, fluid line serves well for sea and clouds. Though more pronounced patterning, as in Cliff at Hunstanton, creates rhythm in the sky, the greater degree of artificiality is not altogether welcome.

Minsmere and Coastguard Cottages adds depth to topographical detail. Architecture accounts for more in Blythburgh, with its disconcerted unstable perspective, and in the more successful Binham Priory. The image of that striking west front is flattened and colours are particularly strong, to bring out the drama of its striking bricked-up tracery.

t The show at Bircham Contemporary Arts, Holt, continues until February 23.