David Powles attended the regional premier of The Goob.

The poster for the film The Goob which was filmed around Norfolk. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The poster for the film The Goob which was filmed around Norfolk. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

The Goob is an excellent film, both tense and absorbing, and deserves to be ranked alongside the best British indie films of recent years, such as Dead Man's Shoes, Son of Rambow and My Summer of Love.

Local actors at the premiere at Cinema City of the film The Goob which was filmed around Norfolk. Fr

Local actors at the premiere at Cinema City of the film The Goob which was filmed around Norfolk. From left, actor Joe Copsey from Norwich; actor Sean Harris, originally from Lowestoft; actor Liam Walpole, from Dereham; and Norwich based director, Guy Myhill. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

Set in deepest (and darkest) Norfolk and starring a plethora of actors with local links, it's a must-see for any film lovers from the county.

But it should reach out much further than Norfolk-alone thanks to some wonderful direction by Norwich's Guy Myhill and some acting of real authenticity, in particular from Dereham's Liam Walpole and Lowestoft's Sean Harris, one of the UK's best, and most menacing, character actors.

The story centres around The Goob (Walpole) and his life milling around the fens of Norfolk, repeatedly clashing with womanising stock car racer and gangmaster Gene Womack (Harris).

We later learn in the post-film Q&A with Myhill and co that stock car racing is deliberately chosen as a focal point of the film because it involves racers repeatedly going round and round in circles - much like the lives of the characters themselves.

Like a lot of films of this type it's only as strong as the performances within and the undoubted highlight of The Goob is the main character himself.

The Goob is a man of few words and an impressively understated performance from Walpole makes him both likeable and intriguing.

Most Read

So good is he, it's hard to believe he was spotted when seen by one of the film's casting crew on his way to buy chips in Dereham.

I mentioned the three films in the introduction deliberately, because there are echoes of all of them in The Goob.

If Dead Man's Shoes director Shane Meadows is superb at capturing sections of life in the Midlands, the same could be said about Myhill and East Anglia.

But this is more than a simple carbon copy of Meadows and upon release this Friday is easily deserving of your money. Myhill himself admits in the Q&A that only 20pc of directors get a second film - a surprising statistic, but we can surely be confident there's more to come from him.

Norfolk-shot film The Goob gets Norwich premiere at Cinema City

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter