Cathedral Consort, Norwich

MICHAEL DRAKE Another night worth staying up late for with this chamber choir and, in particular, to hear them at their best in the Tallis's Lamentation of Jeremiah.

MICHAEL DRAKE

Another night worth staying up late for with this chamber choir and, in particular, to hear them at their best in the Tallis's Lamentation of Jeremiah.

This, in complete contrast to the opening Byrd “Laudibus in sanctis” in which there were one or two over-enthusiastic phrases, was sensitive, well-balanced and full of thought.

There followed Vaughan Williams' Mass in G Minor for double choir with a ringing opening Kyrie and exciting Gloria, given a luminous performance.


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Benjamin Britten doesn't make things easy for his singers but the Consort gave the Hymn to St Cecilia, a musical painting of high colour with each section of the choir being allowed vocal emphasis as Auden's words demanded. The same composer's delightful Five Flower Songs too received more word brushing, the Daffodils waving to their end while the clever musical descriptions of Marsh Flowers was well interpreted and with precision.

And in the whole programme none displayed well-balanced ensemble singing better than the Evening Primrose, with the rhythmical Ballard of Green Broom a lively climax – try saying “green broom” quickly without mistake!

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t The Cathedral Consort were playing at Norwich Cathedral.

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