Between Friends, King's Lynn

ALISON CROOSE A shared musical empathy is a vital quality in any ensemble, and it is never more important than in jazz – as demonstrated in this show.

ALISON CROOSE

A shared musical empathy is a vital quality in any ensemble, and it is never more important than in jazz – as demonstrated in this show at King's Lynn Corn Exchange.

Empathy was present in generous measure when that much-loved doyen of the jazz scene, Humphrey Lyttelton, took to the stage with a comparative newcomer, singer Stacey Kent and her husband, saxophonist Jim Tomlinson.

It may have been a collaboration of – affectionately speaking – ancient and modern but it was very clear that Humph has found a great meeting of musical minds with the two young pretenders. They combined to present a lively programme given scintillaing treatment. It was a evening of sheer foot-tapping delight.

Stacey Kent gave her own distinctive interpretations of her husband's arrangements of Sunny Side of the Street, You're Driving Me Crazy and Louis Armstrong's signature tune, When It's Sleepy Time Down South.

Respected jazz musicians Kathy Stobart (saxophone), Pete Strange (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (alto sax), Ted Beament (piano), Adrian McIntosh (drums) and Mick Hutton (bass) gave memorable renditions – not least of Creole Love Call.

Most Read

The icing on the cake was that Humph could not resist adding his inimitable sense of humour to the entertainment.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter