Ashes skipper Vaughan brings unusual art to Norwich

Sarah BrealeyHis cover drive was pure art to his millions of fans, while his captaincy of the England cricket team featured the brush strokes of brilliance.Now Michael Vaughan, the first man to skipper an Ashes-winning England side for 18 years, is marrying cricket and creativity as he brings his unusual art to a Norwich gallery.Sarah Brealey

His cover drive was pure art to his millions of fans, while his captaincy of the England cricket team featured the brush strokes of brilliance.

Now Michael Vaughan, the first man to skipper an Ashes-winning England side for 18 years, is marrying cricket and creativity as he brings his unusual art to a Norwich gallery.

Vaughan, who retired from the game earlier this year, will be displaying his work at Castle Galleries Norwich, North Terrace, Chapelfield, from November 28 to December 20.

The paintings, billed as "Damien Hirst meets Jackson Pollock", were created by Vaughan, his bat and a paint-covered cricket ball.

Using the technique, described as "artballing", Vaughan paints each cricket ball a symbolic colour and then bats it against a blank canvas to create his abstract art, with a story woven into each canvas.

Using his favoured cover drives, square cuts and pull shots, the four limited-edition prints include Six!, Power Play, Day/Night and Yes, No, Maybe?

Most Read

Vaughan, England's most successful cricket captain, who led the Ashes-winning squad of 2005, said: "It is a very rare thing to be able to follow a career path that you love and the opportunity to combine my two greatest passions - art and cricket - has been a sublime moment in an extraordinary life of highs and low, dreams and sometimes nightmares.

"Artballing captures the drama, speed and excitement of cricket in one precious, dynamic visual moment that, unlike the perfect six, lasts a lifetime."

The work is published by Washington Green Fine Art Publishing. Each limited-edition print has been hand-finished and signed by Vaughan.

The pictures show Michael Vaughan's 'artballing' technique and one of the resulting pictures, called 'Power Play'.