Adrian Lucas, Norwich

CHRISTOPHER SMITH Adrian Lucas made a welcome return to the city and concert hall where he made such a mark on the musical scene a few years back.

CHRISTOPHER SMITH

Adrian Lucas made a welcome return to the city and concert hall where he made such a mark on the musical scene a few years back. He presented a programme designed to demonstrate the qualities of the St Andrew's Hall organ while mainly concentrating on the British repertory of the late nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth.

Aptly for both the Golden Jubilee and the William Walton centenary, he began with Orb and Sceptre. Stirring fanfares enlivened the open-hearted Coronation march, with its solemn moments lending strength to the grand climax.

Making a contrast with its hushed opening, Frank Bridge's Adagio in E rose to an emotional peak, but only briefly, before returning to its pensive manner. Next, as was fitting, since he is now organist at Worcester Cathedral, Lucas saluted Edward Elgar's achievements.

The Sonata in G was shown to be a kaleidoscope of moods, with long melodies and a characteristic foible for melancholy, and all the rather faded charm of the Chanson de Nuit and the Chanson de Matin was brought out.

Two 'rags' by Billy Mayerl naturally invited a different tone and touch. Then the over-exuberant Toccata in F minor by the French composer Jules Grison was given the full romantic treatment, and for an encore Lucas switched on the tremolo.

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