Search

Why I run: Broadcasting legend Helen McDermott explains why she is determined to keep running in her later years

PUBLISHED: 18:00 25 May 2018

Helen McDermott celebrates completing the London Marathon. Picture: Helen McDermott

Helen McDermott celebrates completing the London Marathon. Picture: Helen McDermott

Archant

Broadcasting legend Helen McDermott explains how she is determined to keep running in her later years

A painting by Helen's mother, Joan, after her daughter completed the London Marathon. Picture: Helen McDermottA painting by Helen's mother, Joan, after her daughter completed the London Marathon. Picture: Helen McDermott

How did you first get into running?

I started running in my thirties when I gave up smoking. It was difficult to run and smoke at the same time! I wanted to try and keep my weight down and running kept me busy and stopped me thinking about food.

What do you like about it? What do you dislike about it?

I enjoy the feeling after running. It’s hard to make myself go sometimes, but it’s worth it to have more energy and a very red face when I finish. 
I really don’t like going out when it’s windy, unless the wind is behind me. I often shout at the wind as I’m running. I also don’t like it when on some days I find it really difficult to run and there is no real reason why.

What’s been your favourite event that you’ve taken part in?

The London Marathon which I have run twice, although not on the same day.

What gadget/item of clothing could you not do without?

Good running shoes.

MORE: Love running? Join the Run Anglia Facebook group here


What are your running goals for this year and why?

Having completed the London Marathon twice my only goal now, at 64, is just to keep going. I no longer do long runs.

Do you ever find it hard to gain motivation to run? If so, why?

Yes, especially when it’s cold, wet and windy. Then I remember how good I’ll feel later and go for it.

Have you had to change your training regime as you’ve got older?

I do fewer miles and walk and run. I have asthma and am creaking a bit now but running helps. Little and often is now my motto.

Is there anyone you look up to running wise? Why?

I look up to my partner Paul Barnes, who started running in his forties and now at 78 is still going. Also Neil Featherby for his shoes, advice and encouragement. I’ve also got to give special mention to my friend, Alison Rostron, who got me through the marathon. She is still a much better runner than me, which is most annoying.

What would be your best piece of advice to other runners?

Accept that some days will be better than others for no good reason and enjoy that wonderful feeling when it’s over!

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists