Liam Walsh v Gervonta Davis: Walsh sees off old warrior as Scot becomes 14th ‘victim’

Liam Walsh on his way to victory over Scott Harrison. Picture: PA

Liam Walsh on his way to victory over Scott Harrison. Picture: PA - Credit: PA

As the countdown continues to Liam Walsh's world title fight, Chris Lakey takes a look at his top five fights, with the spotlight on a clash with an old warrior.

Scott Harrison stands dejected after losing to Liam Walsh. Picture: PA

Scott Harrison stands dejected after losing to Liam Walsh. Picture: PA - Credit: PA

April 20, 2013, Copper Box

Scott Harrison had had his problems: depression, drug and alcohol abuse, run-ins with the police here and abroad.

But Harrison still cut a fearsome figure – even when he joined Walsh for the pre-fight weigh in.

But good fighters are not intimidated by looks. Boxers earn respect in the ring, and Harrison, despite all his troubles, walked into the squared circle as a former two-time world champion – and ready for a Battle of Britain.

Liam Walsh celebrates defeating Scott Harrison during the WBO European Lightweight Championship figh

Liam Walsh celebrates defeating Scott Harrison during the WBO European Lightweight Championship fight at Wembley Arena, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday April 20, 2013. Photo credit should read: Nick Potts/PA Wire. - Credit: PA


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The Scot's ambition to get back into the top echelons of the sport was not to be taken lightly; he carried a burning passion to reignite his boxing career, in much the same way as the Harrison package entered every fray. And such men are dangerous.

At the time, Walsh was 26 (nine years Harrison's junior) and had 13 wins on his record – Harrison was vastly more experienced, with 27 wins from 31 outings, including just two defeats.

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It was a confrontation that didn't necessarily make a man out of Walsh: it just added that extra bit of experience, knowledge, know-how - another, different type of challenge conquered and ticked off the list.

Walsh suffered a cut above his right eye in the first round, perhaps through an accidental clash of heads, but was always in control. Never threatened, never intimidated.

Liam Walsh on the shoulders of twin brother Ryan. Picture: PA

Liam Walsh on the shoulders of twin brother Ryan. Picture: PA - Credit: PA

It wasn't easy – it wasn't supposed to be – and Harrison gave as good as he got. But Walsh was just too clever, too classy, for the old dog, boxing on the back foot, happy to pick his moments.

It went the distance, but in the penultimate round Walsh had Harrison in all sorts of trouble on the ropes, only for the bell to intervene. Harrison finished the fight a weary man indeed.

'I was cut in the first – I don't think he nutted me, but it seemed we were both rolling and we clipped heads,' said Walsh.

'He was saying in the ring, 'come on, come one, give me some more' and I was saying the same – it was banter and I was enjoying it.

'I train every day and I love to fight – that might be one of my big problems, I like to fight too much.

'I should box – that way I wouldn't have three stitches in one eye and one in the other and a hand in ice and a sore body.'

These are the prices boxers pay as they strive to get to the top of their sport.

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