Other sporting pressures convinced BSPA chief Buster Chapman to sell King’s Lynn Town Football Club

Buster Chapman was all smiles at The Walks yesterday. Picture: IAN BURT

Buster Chapman was all smiles at The Walks yesterday. Picture: IAN BURT

Buster Chapman admitted a weight had been lifted off his shoulders after turning his back on football.

From left, in 2010, Gary Setchell, Kevin Boon and Buster Chapman. Picture: MATTHEW USHER

From left, in 2010, Gary Setchell, Kevin Boon and Buster Chapman. Picture: MATTHEW USHER - Credit: Matthew Usher

The 57-year-old rode to the rescue when King's Lynn went bust in December 2009 – despite having no affinity to the beautiful game.

It may not have been a match made in heaven but six years on reformed King's Lynn Town are in a far, far better place than they were when the town's most influential sporting figure added to his business empire.

And that's what helped convince King's Lynn Stars chief Chapman to finally sell up, coupled with the growing demands of his first year as the chairman of the British Speedway Promoters' Association.

Chapman said: 'We wanted to make sure it was left in good hands.


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'We could have put it on the open market and done lots of things with it. I wasn't prepared to do that. I've worked things through with Steve (Cleeve, new owner) and I think it's the best way for the club to go.

'Yes, it's pressure off (my wife) Cheryl and myself. The other stadium (Adrian Flux Arena, home of the Stars) has got busier and busier. The speedway chairmanship has got busy. The FIM (International Motorcycling Federation) stuff has got busy.

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'Everything about my life in the last two years has gone crazy and at my age I should be getting less work, not more. Something had to give.

'Obviously I've got to have a social life and family life, I've got grandchildren, and that was getting less and less. It is a big commitment to run a football club and I don't think people realise the amount of work that goes on behind the scenes. It's a massive, massive commitment and if it isn't your passion it's a bit harder.

'I do all the work at the other place (AFA, Saddlebow Road) and I thrive on it because it's in my heart, it's my passion.'

Cleeve had been pestering Chapman for three years to buy out his control of the club. That power of persuasion has now paid off.

'I felt that Cheryl and myself have taken the club as far as we can with the help we've had from all of our friends, sponsors and associates – everyone has helped massively to get the club where it is to this day,' Chapman added.

'I just don't think we could take it any further. With a bit of new blood in and a new lot of enthusiasm I think it'll go a long way.'

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