'The story of our season' - Roeder

Chris Lakey Glenn Roeder summed up in one sentence just what Norwich City's biggest problems have been this season - and what he has to do to fix it. "The whole season is summed up that we have played some excellent football and created chances - now I need to find players who can take the chances and defenders who don't make silly mistakes that lead to goals," he said.

Chris Lakey

Glenn Roeder summed up in one sentence just what Norwich City's biggest problems have been this season - and what he has to do to fix it.

"The whole season is summed up that we have played some excellent football and created chances - now I need to find players who can take the chances and defenders who don't make silly mistakes that lead to goals," he said.

The Canaries led after just 12 minutes, through Darren Huckerby, but were pegged back by half-time after a penalty decision that Roeder said Mark Clattenburg got badly wrong.


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But while City had played good, attractive football in the first half, chances again went begging - and their failure in front of goal coupled with a dismal second-half performance, opened the gates for Wednesday, who will wonder why other teams haven't been so generous to their cause this season.

"We had them at full stretch and in serious trouble," Roeder said. "It was just our inability to finish off our chances which has been one of our major problems this season - you can see how few goals we have scored. We have to too many chances to score one goal."

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Huckerby's opener was cancelled out by Deon Burton, who picked himself up to score from the spot after Jason Shackell was adjudged to have brought him down illegally.

"The lifeline they got thrown was Mark Clattenburg's really poor decision on the penalty - and I actually think he is one of the best referees in this country," said Roeder.

"It was a poor decision and it is outside the box. If you freeze frame it when he makes the challenge he is outside the box so if he is going to get it wrong he should have got it wrong with a free-kick outside the box - he got it wrong twice.

"One is the actual challenge - he pokes the ball back to the keeper and the player falls over him, and secondly it's not even in the penalty box, and Mark knows it. He is a good referee, a very good referee.

"But he is human like everyone else. Fortunately we are not here today where we needed a point or three.

"You can see our intentions in the opening 20 minutes and the rest of the first half that we were here to win for ourselves, not for anyone else."

After that, goals from Ben Sahar, a second from Burton and a fourth from sub Leon Clarke, put the polish on a good day for Wednesday - and let Roeder to dissect just what went wrong at the back.

The goals were shocking, absolutely shocking," he said. "If you go through them, the second one we had seven defenders in the box to their two attackers and let the ball drift to the far post.

"The third one starts - there are errors after - with Lee Croft not being able to control a simple ball that is played out to him. It goes under his studs - something you wouldn't want to see on a Sunday morning on a park pitch let alone Hillsborough this afternoon. After that we didn't do well in squeezing out to the edge of the box and leaving their players offside. The cross comes in and they have a free header, no one is picking up.

"The fourth, the big lad just brushed too many people aside. Too weak - mentality too weak - and it will change."

Roeder has a big summer ahead of him, but the task of bringing in fresh blood can hardly be any bigger than the one he faced on October 31, when he took over the reins from Peter Grant, with City bottom of the table with just eight points.

"I have had a look and there are not too many teams on eight points in the first week of November that have survived - they go down," he said. "It has been a hell of an achievement and everyone involved in the club needs a pat on the back for achieving what we did last week against QPR - but that doesn't let them off for the second-half performance.

"The second half was totally unacceptable and that is the Norwich I don't want and won't have."

The past and the future was on show - 39-year-old Dion Dublin, playing his last game before retirement, and 17-year-old goalkeeper Declan Rudd, on the bench for the first time.

The reception for Dublin was exceptional from all sides of the ground.

"I am not surprised the Sheffield Wednesday supporters stood up like they did and applauded him because Dion Dublin's name in football all round the country is first class," said Roeder. "He has had a football career to die for - 20 years in the game. A lot of it has been played at the top level, he has played for his country, and I think what people realise as well, apart from being a top footballer he is a top human being with lots of humility. He is my type of person and lots of others as well. I just hope he has a happy retirement and gets good things out of the rest of his life. The lads were upset and rightly so that they didn't give him a better send off, that he has take away into retirement a 4-1 defeat."

As for Rudd, his time will come.

"I decided yesterday what an opportunity not to be missed for a young goalkeeper," Roeder said. "He is an England keeper and he has played for his country at Under-17 level - I know the lad's character and I know he has a big future at Norwich. I told he was here to carry the skips until about two hours before kick-off."

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