No more Mr Nice Guy

Dion Dublin wants the Canaries to ditch the Mr Nice Guy tags and find a nasty streak that will lead them back to the Premiership. The walls of Fortress Carrow Road crumbled last season, with eight defeats in 23 home games in the Championship - too easy for visiting teams, according to Dublin.

Dion Dublin wants the Canaries to ditch the Mr Nice Guy tags and find a nasty streak that will lead them back to the Premiership.

The walls of Fortress Carrow Road crumbled last season, with eight defeats in 23 home games in the Championship - too easy for visiting teams, according to Dublin.

“What we need to do is to turn Norwich City round as a club, as a bunch of fans and as a team,” he said.

“We need to make Norwich City Football Club a fortress. We don't want to make it a pretty place to come and play. We need to make it a place that people do not want to come and play - because it's hard, because they get a hard time, because they are a hard team to play against, because the fans don't stop singing. We need that at Norwich City in order to go forward.

“Everything about Norwich City is 'nice'. We need to get rid of that 'nice' tag and become a little more horrible.”

However, Dublin says City can make significant improvements next season - a conviction that helped him decide to extend his career by another year.

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“The manager spoke to me lots last season on a one-to-one basis and he was telling me what he wanted to do and what his plans were and that he wanted me to stay, and at 37, 38, for a manager to want you to stay and for the whole club to want you to stay, I must have done something right,” he said.

“Everything the manager has said to me and I've said to the manager, hopefully it will spark a good reaction to the football club, and I think we can do something. I'm not signing just to have a middle of the road season as an individual.

“I'm not signing to have a middle of the road season as a team. I'm signing hopefully to help the team get some silverware this season.”

Dublin put pen to paper on a new deal this week, having been given extra time by manager Peter Grant to consider the domestic implications of another year of travelling between the family's Midlands base and Norwich.

“I'm very pleased to be re-signing for a club I feel very at home with,” said Dublin, who celebrated his 38th birthday in April by making his 700th career appearance. “Hopefully, next season can be the successful one we all want, as the last one wasn't.

“We have the potential but we have to stop talking about it and do it.”

The fans voted Dublin runner-up to Darren Huckerby in the Player of the Year awards - and Grant says the yellow and green army deserves much credit for persuading him to stay on.

“I'm delighted,” Grant said. “He deserves his contract. Everybody saw what quality he had last season, and for the four or five months I was here, he has been terrific on and off the field. He's a fantastic professional.

“It's great for the supporters, and they and the board have played their part in wanting to keep him. There was never any problem with the deal as the board were committed in wanting Dion to stay. He deserves his contract.”

Dublin was at Norwich in 1988, but four goals in 13 reserve games wasn't enough to persuade then manager Dave Stringer to sign him. He made his name at Cambridge United, earning a £1m move to Manchester United, where his dream was short-lived after a broken leg - and then the arrival of one Eric Cantona.

Dublin moved on to Coventry and Aston Villa, for whom he played in the 2000 FA Cup final. He later played for Millwall and his hometown club Leicester. He also won four full caps for England during his Premiership days.

He moved to Norwich as a free agent last September, having spent part of the previous season with Glasgow Celtic.