Kingfisher closes its curtains in style

The last days at the Kingfisher Lake at Lyng before it closes for the annual break produced some excellent carp, the heaviest a mirror of 32lb 5oz for David Arnold of North Walsham and another of 27lb 8oz for David Bullimore of Norwich.

The last days at the Kingfisher Lake at Lyng before it closes for the annual break produced some excellent carp, the heaviest a mirror of 32lb 5oz for David Arnold of North Walsham and another of 27lb 8oz for David Bullimore of Norwich.

Wymondham teenager Billy Dowie bagged 18 pike to over 10lb in a two-day session at the weekend - all of them falling to dead baits. The Lyng day ticket lake is remaining open.

Top fish at the Swangey Lakes was a 31lb mirror carp for Attleborough's Glen Hales who had two others in the high 20s. Ben Dower, Suffolk, bagged a brace of mirrors just short of 30lb while Carl Cleere, Norwich and Daniel Wood, King's Lynn, both netted mirrors in the mid-20s.

The best carp at Waveney Valley was a common of 27lb for Brampton's Terry Ellwood and a mirror of 28lb 2oz for Loddon's Andrew Goldsmith.


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On the open match scene the annual team challenge for Yarmouth and District clubs was hugely competitive this year with 15 squads of four lining up around the Barford Railway and Willow Lakes on Sunday.

Top individual was Barry Rilings of Gorleston's Jolly Boys with 83lb 4oz from the Willow, but it was the all-round effort by the Floaters' outfit who carried off team honours with 16 penalty points thanks to the efforts of father and son Richard and Robert Silverwood who scored first and second in their section.

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Pete Ashton of Anglers' Corner winched in the top bag of the week at Mill Farm on Thursday with a 92lb 12oz winner, and Little Melton came good for Paul Ashford of Jewsons who won the midweek match with 80lb 3oz.

t A Norfolk angler who is dissatisfied with the fishing facilities on offer for local disabled rodmen and women is searching for a suitable lake to convert into a 100pc wheelchair-friendly fishery environment.

Darren Layfield of Barnard Avenue, Great Yarmouth who was crippled by a serious accident two years ago and has been confined to a wheelchair ever since, believes commercial fisheries do not go far enough to provide facilities for the physically handicapped who need to feel comfortable and safe at the waterside.

“Quite a number of permit waters made an effort to cater for the disabled, but because the owners are fully able-bodied they fail to understand our problems and think we are whinging for the sake of it,” declared the 32-year-old carp enthusiast.

“The fact is, people like me feel we are accident prone at the waterside, and although some waters provide special areas where wheelchairs can be parked on a level surface beside the water, sometimes there are other hazards such as manoeuvring down steep slopes on rough grounds.

“I accept this illustration that could lead to a drowning tragedy is extreme but that fear is never far from one's mind.”

As well as safe access disabled anglers also require another important facility - an easily accessible toilet.

“Some fisheries have toilet blocks on site but few are suitable for anglers like me,” explained Darren.

“Again, I believe this is because there is a lack of understanding that in order to make the best of our lives we are very much dependent on other people.”

He concluded: “This is why I want to buy and develop my own fishery for the disabled.

“I have one or two irons in the fire and I hope to set up angling coaching courses for the disabled and deprived children.”

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