James, 6, maintains a family tradition

Frostbites have, since their formation in 1933, been renowned as a family orientated club, and last Sunday saw their first fourth generation member and sailor when Matthew Thwaites took six-year-old James Percival-Cooke out for his first race on the water.

Frostbites have, since their formation in 1933, been renowned as a family orientated club, and last Sunday saw their first fourth generation member and sailor when Matthew Thwaites took six-year-old James Percival-Cooke out for his first race on the water.

James' great grandfather HT 'Perci' Percival was a founder of the club in 1933, and two years earlier contested the first Norfolk dinghy race sailing Windy, which he bought the following year and which is now owned by James' grandmother Gilly Percival.

Gilly's late husband Tom was for many years until his untimely death in 1984 also a keen Frostbite and Norfolk sailor.

A field of 14 Norfolks raced in two starts for the class race, and this time the first start had the best of it and they took the first six places overall.

Kevin Edwards and Rory Kelsey eventually won by three minutes, after John and Caroline Ellis lost the plot after leading the early stages.

Matthew Thwaites and John Clabburn took second gun by less than 30 seconds after a close match with Mike Lees and Joe Kingston.

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In the second start, things were much closer, Ray Johnson and Leona Levine leading for most of the race and repelling a strong challenge from Jan Hubbard and Sue Gilbert on the last round to take the honours, with Sam and Bernie Woodcock third, all finishing within a minute of each other.

The handicap race, in which young James sailed, saw Edwards repeating his win, albeit by a slightly reduced margin, while Kate and David Mackley recovered well from an indifferent start to take second gun ahead of Geoff Evans and Lucy Blowers.

This Sunday sees the first leg of the Christmas series, and the Rum Punch Sunday festivities, with the second leg being sailed on Boxing Day.

Snowflakes turned out nine Yeomans, sailing in Force 1-2 easterlies similar to those at Frostbites.

Roger and Paul Claxton won both the first and second races.

The first saw Basil and Audrey Green doing very well, getting away at the start and holding the lead for much of the race. The Claxtons, over at the start, battled through the fleet into third place at the end of the first round, and then capitalized when Green lowered his spinnaker on the second round at the mid-course mark by the clubhouse while Claxton kept his on and benefited from the extra power to come through and win by five minutes.

In the second race, Phil Betts and George Williams were early pace-setters, but succumbed to the Claxtons, Peter Marriott and Bob MacKeen, and Ian Hanson and Q Stewart, who were always in close contention throughout as places changed with bewildering frequency until Claxton won, just six seconds ahead of Marriott, with Hanson a further 12 seconds adrift.

Last week proved beyond doubt that the most effective way of gauging one's readership is to create a Grade A foul-up, and my thanks to the many readers who called, or caught me at the BA Navigation Committee a week ago.

Judges and Lawyers, both sea and land, ascribed it to my disregarding the classic text "Ignorantis technologicoitus neminem excusat", or, as Matthew Thwaites put it, "You obviously pressed the wrong button".

Thanks also to the EDP who bailed me out by printing the correct report on Friday, but the fault was entirely mine.