Advisors who seem to want last say on everything

Chris BishopWEST NORFOLK AND FENS: A cacophony of sound filled the air as the great thunder heads sailed in from The Wash and a skylark's staccatto trill serenaded Springside Lake. My eyes were drawn away from my float to scan the heavens for this pint-sized prima donna, smaller than a starling, with lungs like a horse.Chris Bishop

A cacophony of sound filled the air as the great thunder heads sailed in from The Wash and a skylark's staccatto trill serenaded Springside Lake.

My eyes were drawn away from my float to scan the heavens for this pint-sized prima donna, smaller than a starling, with lungs like a horse.

All I briefly saw was a dot hurtling upwards, rising vertically in a blur of wings. Its song continued as it disappeared into the storm clouds massing overhead.

I know many anglers delight in the wildlife they see around them. Yet more revelations about Natural England show our sport is anything but safe if these government conservation advisors get their way.


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After an abortive but entertaining episode regarding zander in the Fens, it now emerges their sights have also been set on carp, with a debate behind the scenes on whether they should be classed as an alien species.

Natural England wants the last say over everything from where and how we fish, to what species clubs can and can't stock and even whether they can trim bankside vegetation or remove snags.

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Public consultation has yet to start. With any luck, this will go the same way as plans to re-introduce the sea eagle.

And with any luck, forthcoming spending reviews will see funding channelled into looking after our rivers - not paying quangocrats to sit around dreaming up new reasons to stop us fishing them.

As the river season starts, Ten Mile Bank is likely to see a fair few out to chance their arm. Colder, wetter weather of late means it could see a good start - remember the bream were found further downstream than the popular pegs around Wissey Mouth last season.

Hunstanton Tackle's up and coming squad has qualified for the Angling Times Super Cup final in a semi-final well off their patch at Moorlands Lake, near Stourport.

They finished fifth out of 15 teams, with the youngsters undaunted about going toe to toe with some of the top adult teams in the Midlands.

Toby Pepper, 15, came second on Moors Lake, Timmy Pepper - who turned 14 on match day - finished third on the Silver Pool, while Jimmy Brookes, 17, came second on Meadow pool.

Hunstanton tackle boss Mick Cornell said: "The team fished really well against some top adult teams. It was really satisfying to receive such positive comments from several teams about the quality of our young team members."

The final takes place on Sunday, July 11, at Tunnel Barn Farm, in the Midlands.

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