Norwich couple defy their disabilities to find love and happiness

Newly weds Sophie and Jason Adams. Picture: JOSEPH CASEY PHOTOGRAPHY

Newly weds Sophie and Jason Adams. Picture: JOSEPH CASEY PHOTOGRAPHY - Credit: Archant

Sophie and Jason Adams, who both have multiple sclerosis (MS), have triumphed over severe disability to find love and a future together.

Newly-weds Sophie and Jason Adams who both have MS. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Newly-weds Sophie and Jason Adams who both have MS. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2016

Sophie and Jason Adams, who both have multiple sclerosis (MS), have triumphed over severe disability to find love and a future together.

The couple, from Hellesdon, met through a disability dating website in spring last year and arranged their first date in a Norwich café.

The incurable condition has left Mrs Adams, 41, unable to speak or move and she communicates using eye movements and a word board. Her husband, 43, also uses a wheelchair but is able to speak.

But the future bride's transition to happiness began on that very first date with the man who has just become her husband.

Newly weds Sophie and Jason Adams who both have MS pictured just after Jason got out of his wheelcha

Newly weds Sophie and Jason Adams who both have MS pictured just after Jason got out of his wheelchair to propose on one knee in October 2015. Picture: SUPPLIED - Credit: SUPPLIED


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'Sophie's chin was down on her chest because she had lost muscle control in her neck,' said Mr Adams.

'I lifted her face up to see her, and for her to look at me. Since then she's been able to hold it up herself.'

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Mrs Adams' parents, Marie and Roger Rought, accompanied their daughter to the first date and Mrs Rought recalled: 'It was love at first sight. Sophie said to me afterwards: 'That's the man I want to marry. He's lovely. I must meet him again.'

Meanwhile Mr Adams, travelling on the bus back to his then home in Holbeach, Lincolnshire, was having doubts.

Sophie Adams, nee Rought, as a student in 1996. Picture: SUPPLIED

Sophie Adams, nee Rought, as a student in 1996. Picture: SUPPLIED - Credit: SUPPLIED

'I was thinking it was pretty worth the three-hour journey to get there but that very attractive lady could do far better - there was no way she would be interested in me,' he said.

He was relieved and delighted when she made contact again and in October last year, after the couple had just left Tesco in Taverham, Mr Adams literally took the plunge.

Armed with his grandmother's engagement ring, he scooted ahead of Sophie in his wheelchair, stopped on the roadside and turned to face her. 'I chucked myself onto the ground, got on one knee and asked her to marry me,' he said.

Comically, Sophie's carer had not seen what was happening and accidentally ran over Mr Adams with the wheelchair carrying his intended - no harm was done.

But both great sadness and high drama lay ahead before the smitten pair could marry, in a ceremony at Norwich's Oaklands Hotel largely planned by Mrs Adams' PA, Sarah SorRento.

Mrs Adams' father, who had given his blessing to the marriage and hoped to give away his daughter, died this spring, four months before the wedding, from the cancer mesothelioma, aged 72.

Knowing that he was ill, the couple had brought their wedding date as far forward as they dared because Mr Adams, who had been separated from his former wife for four years but not divorced, had to ensure his decree absolute came through in time.

It arrived just 24 hours before the wedding, causing 'a lot of near heart attacks,' according to Mrs Rought.

But the wedding day went off like a dream with the clothes-conscious bride dressed in a sleeveless heavy satin off-white gown with a crystal bodice and full skirt.

'It was a very emotional day, with so many tears of happiness,' said Mrs Rought. 'They are so happy together. This is a fairytale beginning, not an ending.'

The newly-weds are saving for a honeymoon cruise next June.

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