Wymondham farmer escapes prison after head-butting a man in a London nightclub

Wymondham farmer Mitchel Britten leaving court in November 2016. Picture: Central News

Wymondham farmer Mitchel Britten leaving court in November 2016. Picture: Central News - Credit: CENTRAL NEWS

A Wymondham farmer who broke a man's nose after head-butting him in a nightclub, has walked free after a judge said he had 'learnt a lesson'.

Mitchel Britten, of Cavick House Farm, was found guilty of causing actual bodily harm during a trial at Isleworth Crown Court last November - after he attacked another clubber on the dance floor at the Embargo Republica Club in Chelsea, London.

The 24-year-old had been drinking while watching cricket at Lord's on May 25 2015, before he went to the club.

He was on the dance floor with the victim when he suddenly attacked him.

The man suffered a broken nose which required surgery and he spent two days in hospital recovering.


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Britten claimed he 'had to push' the victim 'with my head into his nose to get some personal space' and could not use his hands to push him away because he was holding his G&T at the time.

Britten was given a community order after Judge Nicholas Wood admitted the usual starting point for a headbutt causing actual bodily harm is jail.

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The judge said the offence was completely 'out of character' for the 'hard working' sheep farmer and ordered him to pay the victim £500 compensation.

He also told Britten he didn't have to pay £3,500 costs towards the prosecution costs.

Judge Wood told the farmer: 'I am going to deal with you by way of a community order, there will be no prison sentence, suspended or not.

'Some might see this as generous but I do not think so when someone looks at the whole case. The remorse is long and genuine.'

The court heard Britten had no previous relevant convictions.

He was sentenced to a community order to undertake 80 hours of unpaid work within a year.

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