Wicklewood pupils move school day into double-decker bus transformed into prayer space

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/q

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/quiet space for pupils. The idea was the brainchild of Andy Jones who started his group Raise to bring Christinanity to schools and groups around Norfolk. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

Pupils in Wicklewood moved from their classrooms to a double-decker bus as they explored faiths.

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/q

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/quiet space for pupils. The idea was the brainchild of Andy Jones who started his group Raise to bring Christinanity to schools and groups around Norfolk. Pictured is Oliver Mee. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

The Wymondham Youth Bus took a break from its usual schedule to act as a prayer space for children's ministry Raise, which helps churches and schools engage with children in Norfolk.

Last week, they parked up at Wicklewood Primary School, where prayer space leader Andy Jones led assemblies and encouraged pupils to ask the big questions.

One of their activities over the week was writing messages of support to those who are caught up in the refugee crisis.

Pupils were also encouraged to think of something they would like to change, write it on a lolly stick and plant a seed, to signal a new start.

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/q

Wicklewood School play host to Wymondham Youth Bus which has been converted to be used as a prayer/quiet space for pupils. The idea was the brainchild of Andy Jones who started his group Raise to bring Christinanity to schools and groups around Norfolk. Pictured is Andy Jones. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

Sheila Greenacre, headteacher at the school, said: 'It is a lovely inclusive way of giving the children and adults a quiet space where they can reflect on some of the bigger issues in life and things that are important to them.'

She said the project offered 'another dimension' to the school's religious education (RE) and personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) lessons.

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The activities were approached from a broadly Christian perspective but were inclusive of all faiths and viewpoints, she added.

Are you hosting an event at a school that we should be writing about? Email reporter Lauren Cope on lauren.cope@archant.co.uk