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Why does EACH need a new £10m hospice in Norfolk?

PUBLISHED: 06:30 21 November 2017

EACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell in the music room. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

EACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell in the music room. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

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Work has started on the £10m EACH nook hospice in Framingham Earl, to replace the Quidenham hospice. Sophie Wyllie looked around the old base.

EACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell, right, and staff nurse Hazel Bloomfield in the tiny lift. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYEACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell, right, and staff nurse Hazel Bloomfield in the tiny lift. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

It has cared for thousands of seriously-ill children and young people and their families since its formation in 1991.

But despite it being a “beautiful building”, Quidenham hospice is now too small to cope with demand and changes in equipment, according to service manager Jane Campbell.

Speaking about the new nook hospice at Framingham Earl, Mrs Campbell said: “It is going to be on one floor with wide corridors. Quidenham hospice is an absolutely gorgeous building and has made a real difference for more than 20 years, but as we get more kit it doesn’t work.

“It is about providing a hub in the centre of Norfolk so families can get to the hospice more easily and hospice staff can get to families’ homes more easily.

“The nook will offer more space as we are very limited at Quidenham. Everything is going to be bigger.”

In May 2017 the hospice - on the grounds of a former religious retreat - cared for 127 children who had 96 different life-threatening and life-limiting conditions from cerebral palsy to severe epilepsy.

Quidenham covers two floors has five bedrooms, one bathroom, two shower rooms, a sensory room, a family sitting room, soft play area, music room, dining area, medicine room and nursing office area.

But all of its rooms are small, the corridors are narrow and the lift is compact.

EACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYEACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

“It is a real challenge,” Mrs Campbell said.

Problems caused by the size restriction include not being able to have certain medicines because they cannot fit a specialist fridge in the medicine room and certain wheelchairs not being able to travel along the corridors.

The nook hospice will be more than double the size of Quidenham and include seven bedrooms; a larger care area; more areas for clinical care and improved medical and nursing equipment; a larger sensory room; dedicated therapy rooms; music studio; and a special area for families.

It will also include a hydrotherapy pool - something Quidenham does not have.

Mrs Campbell added: “It will make a real difference having a pool in the hospice. At the moment it takes four staff members to go off site to deliver a two-hour swimming session. I’m very excited and the staff are really looking forward to moving.”

Short break care support

A Norfolk family has spoken about how Quidenham has been a lifeline for them. Bella and Matt Moxon and their daughters, Maisie, 15, and Matilda, 13, live in Plumstead.

The logo for the nook appealThe logo for the nook appeal

They have been using services at EACH’s Quidenham hospice since Matilda was four-years-old.

Matilda has mitochondrial cytopathy complex - meaning her body does not have the energy required to develop properly.

The teenager needs 24-hour care to help with her everyday needs and is unable to talk, walk, support her own weight or feed herself.

Matilda goes to Quidenham for overnight short break care, her sister Maisie attends sibling groups and the family attend EACH events and days out.

Bella Moxon, Matilda’s mother, said: “EACH is a lifeline to us. Matilda’s stays at EACH are so important as they enable us to have time with Maisie where we can focus on her and also some time to ourselves.”

How to support the nook appeal

From buying a Christmas decoration to a virtual brick - there are many ways to support the nook appeal.

EACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell in one of the bedrooms. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYEACH Quidenham Hospice, which needs it's planned £10m new base as the staff work in cramped conditions. Service manager Jane Campbell in one of the bedrooms. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

■The nook friends group - The volunteer fundraising group wants people to save loose change in collection boxes this winter. Contact Judith Sykes on 01508 494873 or email judyannsykes@btinternet.com.

■Buy a brick - People can buy a brick for £20, £100, £500 or £1,000 in memory of a loved one for a virtual wall. Visit www.each.org.uk/buyabrick

■My £10 challenge - People can give up something that will save £10. Participants need to photograph themselves showing how they saved the money, sharing it on social media via #My10pound and donating via www.each.org.uk or by texting NOOK10 £10 to 70070.

■EACH Butterfly baubles - Intu Chapelfield in Norwich is selling 2,017 baubles for £30 or £35.

■To help with any form of fundraising call 01953 666767 or email norfolk@each.org.uk.

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