What is going to happen to The Coast Road? Flood-hit residents question future of their villages along vulnerable north Norfolk coast

Salthouse residents questioned what the future held for their village after it was flooded during Ja

Salthouse residents questioned what the future held for their village after it was flooded during January's storm surge. They have called for improved sea defences amid fears it could be washed away. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Salthouse shopkeeper Susan McKnespiey claimed the environment agency don't want to build new sea defences within the Norfolk Coast Area of Natural Beauty - because they would be too 'unsightly'.

The main road through Salthouse was cut off by the sea after the storm surge. A sign in the distance

The main road through Salthouse was cut off by the sea after the storm surge. A sign in the distance warns of a duck crossing ahead. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Fed-up villagers have demanded action after they narrowly avoided being washed away by the sea during the weekend storm surge.

Peter and Susan McKnespiey, owners of Cookie's Crab Shop in Salthouse, suffered thousands of pounds worth of damage to their business during the last serious floods to hit the area - in December 2013.

During the high tide on Friday night, the water stopped just centimetres from their front door. However, with claims a shingle bank was washed away, the neighbouring nature reserve at Cley was flooded and the main Coast Road between Sheringham and Cley was cut off.

The couple claim the environment agency, which builds, maintains and operates flood defences all over the country, don't want to construct new sea defences within the Norfolk Coast Area of Natural Beauty - because they would be too 'unsightly'.

Concerns have been raised for the future of the A149 Coast Road between Sheringham and Blakeney afte

Concerns have been raised for the future of the A149 Coast Road between Sheringham and Blakeney after it was cut off by the sea. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant


You may also want to watch:


Mr and Mrs McKnespiey claim the land around Salthouse is considered managed retreat - which allows an area that was not previously exposed to flooding by the sea to become flooded by removing coastal protection.

And now they have questioned the future of their village, and neighbouring communities along the vulnerable A149 Coast Road, if it is allowed to disappear into the sea.

Most Read

Reflecting on last night's drama, Mr McKnespiey said: 'I think we were very lucky because what little bit of bank we had kept the tide back. Now we've got nothing.

'If we're in managed retreat, when they are not going to do anything, perhaps someone will answer the question: what will happen to the Coast Road? If we're in managed retreat, where is the traffic going to go? Or will all the businesses along this Coast Road disappear?

The A149 Coast Road was submerged by the sea in Salthouse. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

The A149 Coast Road was submerged by the sea in Salthouse. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

'They don't want to spend any money, so the concern is what is going to happen to the Coast Road if that disappears? Holt couldn't take the volume of traffic and all these little businesses would close. What is the future for our villages? I think they need to do something.'

But Mrs McKnespiey added: 'They won't put rocks in because it doesn't look nice - that's what they said the last time.'

Homes in Salthouse were evacuated and a rest centre set up in the village hall just hours before the storm surge hit around 7pm on Friday night. However, police officers had to be rescued by the fire service after becoming stranded.

And the main road through the village remained blocked by sea water and debris on Saturday.

June Kirkbride runs the old Post Office shop and deli in Salthouse. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

June Kirkbride runs the old Post Office shop and deli in Salthouse. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Louise De Lisle, who just moved to Salthouse six months ago, said: 'This is the first time since moving here that I've had this flood and I got my floodgates in and my board up so I was quite prepared, but the sheer force of nature was just incredible. And when you see it come in you do wonder if it is going to go away.

'I was watching it from my upstairs window and it came halfway up my wall but thankfully it kept it at bay.The flood wardens and the police came round just to make sure everything was okay so I felt safe and I felt that there were people there if I needed them.'

Most homes and businesses escaped any flooding but, as the sea subsides ahead of another high tide this evening, the mess left behind by the sea and resultant road closures is continuing to cause disruption for those affected.

June Kirkbride, who installed new flood defences at the old Post Office shop and deli in Salthouse after it was hit in the storm surge of December 2013, said: 'It came really quietly, it's good that it didn't come in.

Residents rallied round to clear the sea debris from the quayside in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVR

Residents rallied round to clear the sea debris from the quayside in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

'It didn't test our new defences because we were flooded in 2013. It was up to twice the skirting board but it was the drying out - eight months I was closed for.

'Just one (home) right at the end of the village have got a little bit in this time but for the most part we've survived.'

With swans swimming along a normally busy Coast Road in Salthouse, the Beach Road bus stop in Cley under water, and a canoe parked on the side of the road in Blakeney, the aftermath of the storm attracted sight-seers from near and far.

But, with narrow back roads quickly becoming choked, motorists are being advised not to travel unless necessary.

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGI

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Roland Goodison, who lives opposite the quay in Blakeney, said: 'The tide came about a metre up our wall and went up the street as far as just before the King's Arms pub.

'We need to clear it (sea derbis) but it's a community effort. We are expecting more tonight but I don't think it will be as bad.'

North Norfolk District Council has confirmed a clear-up operation is underway across the region this weekend following Friday night's high tide and gale force winds.

Officers have been out assisting people overnight and checking for damage along the seafront and promenades.

The sea crashes into the beach at Cley. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

The sea crashes into the beach at Cley. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Cromer Pier has been closed after being damaged by waves and is likely to remain closed until Monday. Some beach huts at Cromer East and West Beach have been lost and there is damage to doors of chalets on the Prom. Meanwhile, the West Prom is likely to remain closed into next week because of damage to the surface of the promenade.

However, council chiefs are hopeful of opening the central area of Cromer Prom on Sunday.

Debris is continuing to be cleared from the promenades in both Cromer and Sheringham and the public is being warned to tread carefully along the coast and adhere to any signs or areas sealed off.

In Overstrand, some beach huts have been lost along with railings in front of the promenade. And concerns have been raiased that people may be accessing the promenade via Clifton Way, which the local authority has warned is dangerous.

Cley nature reserve and neighbouring road to the beach was flooded during the storm surge. Picture:

Cley nature reserve and neighbouring road to the beach was flooded during the storm surge. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Councillor Tom FitzPatrick, Leader of North Norfolk District Council, said: 'We are out in force today to assess and repair the damage caused by the storm surge and I would like to urge people to respect the safety signs.

'Staff have been working alongside the community flood wardens, police, fire and coastguard to help our communities in the face of the surge and gale force winds; and for our teams the focus now is on helping the community to clear the debris and get everything safe and open to the public as quickly as possible.'

Salthouse crept ever closer to the sea after the storm surge broke through its natural defences. Pic

Salthouse crept ever closer to the sea after the storm surge broke through its natural defences. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

A canoe was among the sea debris to land on the quayside in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

A canoe was among the sea debris to land on the quayside in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

An upturned boat sits at the side of the Coast Road, close to the aptly named Beach Road bus stop. P

An upturned boat sits at the side of the Coast Road, close to the aptly named Beach Road bus stop. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGI

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

This notice at Cley asked the public to please help protect sea defences. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

This notice at Cley asked the public to please help protect sea defences. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

The storm surge didn't reach the same levels as previous high tides which are recorded on a seafront

The storm surge didn't reach the same levels as previous high tides which are recorded on a seafront wall at Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

The coastline is changing, this sign at Cley beach informs. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY

The coastline is changing, this sign at Cley beach informs. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

The aptly named Beach Road bus stop in Cley was submerged in water following the storm surge. Pictur

The aptly named Beach Road bus stop in Cley was submerged in water following the storm surge. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGI

The community rallied round to clear the sea debris from the streets in Blakeney. Picture: ALLY McGILVRAY - Credit: Archant

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter