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Roads melt as Norfolk sees new record set for county's hottest ever day

PUBLISHED: 20:16 25 July 2019 | UPDATED: 07:35 26 July 2019

A  hot and sunny Gorleston beach  Picture: James Bass

A hot and sunny Gorleston beach Picture: James Bass

Archant Norfolk © 2016

Thursday's heatwave saw the hottest day ever recorded in Norfolk, with the mercury soaring to 35.8C, forecasters confirmed and police closing the A11 due to melting tarmac.

The hottest temperature ever seen in the county was recorded in August 2003, with 35.7C in Morley St Botolph, near Wymondham.

But today, forecasters confirmed this week's heatwave had smashed that record, with Marham, near King's Lynn, a scorching 35.8C today (Thursday, July 25).

And Norfolk police reported having to close a stretch of the A11 "due to melting tarmac causing a danger to road users".

"It was 35.8C which is a record temperature for Norfolk," Adam Dury, from Weatherquest, said.

"West has been worst affected. It's been 36.3C on the border and between Thetford and Marham it could well have been higher."

He added: "Houghton Hall reached 34.8C and Cromer, on the coast, saw 31.9C, while Norwich reached temperatures of 33.2C."

The record July temperature in Norfolk is believed to have been 34.7C at Tibenham on July 27, 2018, which was also beaten by today's figures in Marham.

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The Met Office also confirmed temperatures this afternoon set a new record for July temperatures across the UK, with 38.1C recorded in Cambridge, just after 3.30pm.

The previous record was 36.7C and was set in Heathrow in 2015.

But Mr Dury said Norfolk had seen the worst of the heat, and added: "We have seen the hottest temperatures, but at night it won't cool down too much. Some areas could stay at 23-24C for the night."

The Met Office also confirmed temperatures this afternoon set a new record for July temperatures across the UK, with 38.1C recorded in Cambridge, just after 3.30pm.

The previous record was 36.7C and was set in Heathrow in 2015.

The Met Office's chief meteorologist, Steve Willington, said: "We're already seeing thunderstorms being triggered by today's hot weather.

"We'll continue to see thunderstorms breaking out this evening and overnight across wide areas of the UK."

He added: "It's going to be very warm tonight across central, eastern and southeastern parts in particular as temperatures falling no lower than 23-24C in places, which could see further temperature records broken."

The current record for the highest overnight temperature ever recorded in the UK is 23.9C, set in August 1990.

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