Village to remember the prince who spent the last 17 years of his life there

The anniversary of the death of Prince Frederick Duleep Singh is being marked with various events in

The anniversary of the death of Prince Frederick Duleep Singh is being marked with various events in the village of Blo Norton where he lived and died. His grave is in the churchyard. Joan Kibble is one of the organisers of the special weekend. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

He was the son of a deposed Indian Maharajah who grew to love his adopted counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

Prince Frederick Duleep Singh in an 1897 photograph.Photo - submitted 12 of 15copy - Isabel Cock

Prince Frederick Duleep Singh in an 1897 photograph.Photo - submitted 12 of 15copy - Isabel CockayneFor: EDP /weeklyCity: Thetford, NorfolkEDP pics © 2004 tel 01603 772434 - Credit: EDP, Archant

Prince Frederick Duleep Singh was the son of the last ruler of the Sikh empire and grew up in Elveden Estate, near Thetford, after his father was deposed in the 19th century.

The prince then spent the last 17 years of his life living in the village of Blo' Norton, near Diss, where he died on August 15, 1926.

To mark the 90th anniversary of his death and his contribution to the region, a series of events have been planed in Blo' Norton during the weekend of August 13 and 14 to remember 'Prince Freddy'.

Over the weekend there will be a display in the village hall and an Indian-themed flower festival in the village church, where the prince is buried.


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On the Saturday, at 2pm, the Sikh biographer of the Duleep Singhs, Peter Bance, will give a talk in the church and the next day, at 2pm, there will be a talk on the prince by Geoffrey Leigh in the village hall.

Prince Frederick lived in Blo' Norton Hall from 1909 to 1926.

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The prince was born in London in 1868.

His father Maharaja Duleep Singh bought the Elveden Estate in 1863 and lived the life of a country gentleman with a taste for the finer things in life.

The Maharajah, who came to the throne of the Punjab, aged five, in 1843, ended up living in Suffolk after he had been effectively exiled to England in 1854 following two wars.

Joan Kibble, one of the event's organisers, said: 'The commemorative exhibitions and talks celebrate the life of someone who endeared himself to the village community.'

The talk by Mr Bance on Saturday, August 13 at 2pm is by ticket only. Call Joan Kibble 01953 681396.

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