US election: The country takes to the polls

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dick

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dickson - Credit: Archant

Trade is brisk at a polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dick

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dickson - Credit: Archant

Throughout the morning people have formed a steady queue at the foot of blocks of flats.

Those who stop to talk after mid-morning voting have given their backing to Hillary Clinton.

It is unsurprising. In urban Manhattan, Donald Trump supporters are in short supply.

A woman in her early 30s tells me she held her nose and voted for Hillary – she was a fan of Mrs Clinton's Democratic nomination rival Bernie Saunders.

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dick

Voters form a queue at polling station in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Picture: Annabelle Dickson - Credit: Archant

But not to vote for Mrs Clinton would be a vote for Donald Trump.

Three first time voters were also Bernie Saunders supporters – but would never have considered voting for anybody other than Hillary.

Most Read

They will stay at home tonight to watch the results. They fear the atmosphere in the city later tonight – whatever the result.

In the United States, election day is taken seriously.

State officials will be given time off during the day to go and cast their vote. Some businesses will do the same.

In the polling station, getting the millions of people through the doors is an efficient process.

Although the staff are flustered, everybody knows their role.

In the United States there is a relief that election day has finally arrived, and for most, a hope that life will return to normal and something other than Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton trading insults will dominate the airwaves.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter