Trials to study dieting link to food intolerance

MARK NICHOLLS A trial to discover whether undetected food intolerances are affecting weight loss for people is looking for volunteers in Norfolk. The trial will use the Food Detective plan developed by Cambridge Nutritional Sciences (CNS) to identify food intolerances.

MARK NICHOLLS

A trial to discover whether undetected food intolerances are affecting weight loss for people is looking for volunteers in Norfolk.

The trial will use the Food Detective plan developed by Cambridge Nutritional Sciences (CNS) to identify food intolerances.

Five volunteers for this region - among 55 nationwide - will be offered three consultations and asked to keep a record of their diet for two weeks and then receive a food intolerance test that will determine future advice for helping them lose weight.

The test uses fresh blood from a finger prick and identifies food sensitivity by measuring IgG antibodies to 59 food groups, with accurate results available within 40 minutes.

The study aims to investigate observations made by nutritionists and nutritional therapists that cutting out foods you are intolerant to can in some patients help them lose weight.

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Susan Fletcher from Norwich is one of the nutritionists taking part in the Fresh Start trial, over-seeing five local volunteers.

She said: "Food intolerances can cause a lot of problems. Symptoms include everything from migraines and irritable bowel syndrome, to constipation, depression, insomnia, chronic fatigue and many more.

"We have found that by identifying the foods which are giving rise to these ailments and avoiding them in the diet, patients see considerable improvements in their health. One of these benefits can be weight loss."

To be eligible to take part in the study, volunteers need to be aged 18-50 and about two stone over their target weight. It is also important that volunteers have no medical problems that would affect their ability to alter their diet and have stuck to diets in the past, but not been able to maintain lower weight. Each nutritionist will be able to offer the trial to up to five patients.

Susan added: "As part of the trial, volunteers will be given an initial consultation about their general health and then be asked to keep a record of their diet for two weeks.

"After this, they'll receive a food intolerance test and be given advice on the best way to alter their diets in order to feel better and hopefully lose weight."

CNS managing director Dr Mike Walker said the professional advice from a nutritionist or other health professional is an important part of the process.

"A nutritionist will look closely at your lifestyle and diet and work out a plan that not only cuts out the foods you are intolerant to, but also advise on how to replace them so that you still eat healthily."

People interested in taking part in the trial should call 01353 863279 or visit www.food-detective.com