Prepare for a world without traffic - UEA experts predict how future transport will look

Mobility-as-a-Service’ apps will mean we can acces a variety of transport modes all in one place. Ph

Mobility-as-a-Service’ apps will mean we can acces a variety of transport modes all in one place. Photo: Emma Cassar - Credit: Archant

Step away from the diesel car and prepare for a world free of traffic jams and accidents.

Emma Cassar is a PhD Researcher in the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University

Emma Cassar is a PhD Researcher in the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia. Photo: Emma Cassar - Credit: Emma Cassar

It might sound like science fiction but according to transit expert, Emma Cassar, an overhaul of the way we get from A to B is inevitable in the next 20 years.

Ms Cassar is a PhD Researcher at the UEA and a member of SILCI, a research team working to lower carbon emissions.

She said: 'The future is all about change. People are always going to have to adapt to new ways of living and the way we travel will be one of them.'

'Electricity is the future, it's included in most transport and some cars now and it's much cleaner than any other source.

Norwich Science Festival 2018 - Robots, Ben Garrod and Danielle George. Photo: Ed Cave

Norwich Science Festival 2018 - Robots, Ben Garrod and Danielle George. Photo: Ed Cave - Credit: Ed Cave


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To help us understand what the next decade will mean for transport, Emma laid out her four top predictions for getting around in the future.

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Emma Cassar's Transport Predictions

No more cars

The reality for people living in urban areas is cars will probably be banned, some as early as 2020. When that happens, we will need to find other methods of getting around.

Fewer cars on the road will mean that the streets are safer, less delays on public transport and much more exercise for people who choose other methods such as walking and cycling.

Autonomous transport

Whatever the mode of travel looks like, the chances are it will be driverless.

The technology for driverless cars and trains is already at an advanced testing stage, but partially automated technology has been around for the last few years with features such as automated parking.

Some people see it as though technology could end up taking jobs, things like self driving cars, planes and trains would still need people on board in case of an emergency.

At the moment the biggest barrier to autonomous transport is public understanding and trust.

Say goodbye to traffic jams

Intelligent transport systems (ITS) are smart infrastructure technologies found in traffic lights, car parks, roads and bridges.

These will become more advanced, meaning they can communicate more effectively with each other and the vehicles using them.

These technologies will make our roads safer and less congested.

Mobility on Demand

Plan, book and pay for your journey using an app that gives you a choice of transport modes including buses, car shares, scooter, trams etc.

The product is called 'Mobility-as-a-Service' and is currently being trialled globally and is available in the West Midlands thanks to the Finnish company MaaS Global, with its app 'Whim'.

FUTURISTIC EVENTS

Smarter Travel with Jonathan Wills

As our cities' populations grow, the daily commute is a battle for many, regardless of their choice of transport.

But could we be moving towards smarter and speedier travel?

Join ITV Anglia's Jonathan Wills as he talks to Liftshare founder and CEO, Ali Clabburn; mass transit UEA PhD student Emma Cassar; Microsoft engineer, Paul Foster, and Martin Wilby, chairman of Norfolk County Council's environment, development and transport committee, as they explore how new technologies will shape our future transport and the way we travel.

Wednesday, October 24

1pm–2pm

The Forum, Auditorium

Free, booking required

Age 12+

Technology: Redefining the Possible

Technology redefines what is possible. Simon Wheatcroft has taken this philosophy and literally run with it.

Losing his sight at seventeen, Simon has utilised technology to augment what he is capable of – initially using off-the-shelf tech, then forging forward to collaborate in creating the technology of the future to enable him to run marathons. Simon truly demonstrates the synergy of man and machine.

Wednesday, October 24

2.30pm–3.30pm

The Forum, Auditorium

£7

Age 8+

Engineering Explorium

Head over to the EEEGR Skills for Energy stand for some interactive, STEM-based games. Visit the Learning Resources® showcase to play with toys that help develop engineering skills. Join KLM UK Engineering to test your hand skills on various aviation tasks and to find out more about aircraft engineering. Plus RAF Air Defence Radar Museum; Easton & Otley College; Network Rail; Hethel Engineering Centre; UEA Engineering and more.

Tuesday, October 23

10am-4pm

Free, drop-in

All ages

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