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These ten buildings in South Norfolk are at risk of being lost

PUBLISHED: 15:32 20 August 2018 | UPDATED: 15:43 20 August 2018

Billingford Mill has been an iconic sight in South Norfolk for 200 yeras. The cap and sails may soon return. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Billingford Mill has been an iconic sight in South Norfolk for 200 yeras. The cap and sails may soon return. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Archant Norfolk Photographic © 2016

The Heritage at Risk Programme (HAR) was launched by Historic England and is used to help assess the overall state of the country's heritage sites.

A large crance removing the cap from Billingdon Mill as part of restoration work. Picture: Ian CartairsA large crance removing the cap from Billingdon Mill as part of restoration work. Picture: Ian Cartairs

The programme aims to reduce the number of sites at risk by identifying those in danger of being lost as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development.

The following heritage sites in South Norfolk which are listed as being at risk:

Billingford Windmill, Billingford Common, Scole

A landmark amid the South Norfolk countryside. This Grade II listed late 19th century five-storey windmill was the last commercially wind-operated mill in Norfolk, closing in 1956. Part of the upper storey was identified as structurally unsound. Currently ‘top-less’ it is now undergoing major repairs before the cap and sails can be reinstated sometime within the next year.

The remains of Bixley Church (St Wandregesilius) after the devestating 2004 fire. Picture: James BassThe remains of Bixley Church (St Wandregesilius) after the devestating 2004 fire. Picture: James Bass

Church of St Wandregelius, Bixley

No longer in use as a place of worship this church was badly damaged by a fire in 2004 which destroyed the roof and interior. A 16th century memorial from the chancel has been removed for safe storage. A repair scheme has been discussed but not implemented.

Church of St Nicholas, Bracon Ash

English Heritage highlights that rainwater gutters and downpipes are causing severe deterioration placing at risk the remains of a very significant 16th century terracotta monument, similar in style and design to those in Oxborough church, commissioned by the Bedingfield family. First phase of a Heritage Lottery Fund Places of Worship grant has been completed but much repair work remains to be done.

Forncett St Mary's church is now used for community events such as the musicals but still has problems. Picture: David KirkForncett St Mary's church is now used for community events such as the musicals but still has problems. Picture: David Kirk

Church of St Mary, Denton

A Heritage Lottery Fund Grants for Places of Worship grant was awarded in 2016 and the repair project is in the development phase for restore this flint-built church with stone dressings and slate roofs which is said to be a very bad condition. Leaking aisle roofs, drainage and high-level repairs now said to be of the utmost urgency.

Church of St Mary, Gissing

The west tower and nave of this church date from the 11th century and characteristic Norman windows of that period survive. Repairs are needed to the masonry and roofs of the tower, north porch and chancel. A Heritage Lottery Fund Grants for Places of Worship grant was offered 2015 and the project is progressing towards repairs.

Royal Engineers soldiers secure the weather vane at the top of All Saints Church at Shelfanger. Picture: Denise BradleyRoyal Engineers soldiers secure the weather vane at the top of All Saints Church at Shelfanger. Picture: Denise Bradley

Church of St Mary, Forncett

Declared redundant in 1985 this church had fallen into very poor condition but has subsequently been returned to use for worship and community activities, winning a Heritage Angels Awards in 2015. A repair grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund for the first phase of work to the nave and chancel has been completed, but the masonry and roofs of the tower and north porch remain in poor condition.

Church of St Botolph, Morley

This parish church dating to the 15th century was restored and re-roofed in the 1960s a number of slipped tiles and heavy moss alongside blocked gutters mean rainwater are in a poor condition throughout. Pigeons in the tower may also be causing damage.

St Margaret's Church in Starston suffers from water damage. Picture: Sonya DuncanSt Margaret's Church in Starston suffers from water damage. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Church of St Margaret, Starston

St Margaret’s Church dates to as early as the 15th century, although parts of the exterior and most of the interior were rebuilt during a 1870 restoration during which a superlative wallpainting of a deathbed scene, believed to be medieval, was discovered in a walled up recess. English Heritage state extensive rain water damage due to poor roof coverings and ground water penetration has left it in a poor condition.

Church of All Saints, Shelfanger

All Saints dates from the early 14th century and stands out for its unusual with diagonal buttresses, chequer flushwork and pyramidal tiled roof. However the Grade I listed building is said by English heritage to be in poor condition with work needed to repair the roof, rainwater goods and drains that are needed to prevent water ingress threatening an important medieval wall painting.

Romano-Celtic Temple, Wicklewood

Just because a building no longer exists doesn’t mean it still can’t be at risk. The site of this Romano-Celtic temple was excavated in 1959. Its outline has been identified subsequently from crop marks visible on aerial photographs, while field walking and metal detecting has recovered a wealth of Roman and earlier finds. Preserving the site is said to have significant problems.



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