The Royal Norfolk Show 2017: King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery stole the show inside the Grand Ring

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in the Grand Prix at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Bur

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in the Grand Prix at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

From fast-paced scurry driving to an impressive display of power by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery - the Grand Ring had it all.

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in the Grand Prix at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Bur

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in the Grand Prix at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Hundreds of people braved the wet weather to watch an action-packed line-up of racing, showjumping, live music and parade events throughout the day.

But it was the royal horse artillery which stole the show as the 80-strong troop charged into the ring shortly after 2pm.

The mounted unit, which is the Queen's own ceremonial saluting battery, pulled six First World War thirteen pounder guns at high speed.

Both the riders and the horses, which are trained by the troop, demonstrated an incredible amount of discipline as they performed a series of manoeuvres.

Scurry driving in the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt

Scurry driving in the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt


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The display finished with a volley from the saluting guns to a round of applause from the crowd.

Bombardier Paul Renton, who regularly visits Fakenham to see his family, said the troop trains all year round in preparation for such parades.

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He added that it takes around a year to 18-months to train the horses, which are brought over from Ireland.

Mr Renton said: 'You have to be switched on and in the zone for an event like this. One moment's lapse of concentration and it could cause a huge catastrophe.

Team of three or four heavy horses in the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt

Team of three or four heavy horses in the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

'But it all becomes second nature in the end and you use muscle memory.'

Other highlights of the Grand Ring throughout the day included the heavy horses and show jumping trials. The fast-paced scurry driving also proved popular with the crowds.

However, there was also some disappointment as the RAF Falcons Parachute Display Team was forced to call off both of its jumps.

Low cloud cover at around 500ft prevented the nine-man display team from safely parachuting out of their aircraft.

The Band of the Parachute Regiment performing in a stand of the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show

The Band of the Parachute Regiment performing in a stand of the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Flight Lieutenant Dave Sellers said cloud cover needed to be above 2,500ft before they could jump.

Despite minor changes to the Grand Ring schedule, visitors were happy with the entertainment on offer.

Tina Conwell, from King's Lynn, said: 'The Royal Artillery was thrilling. To see that many horses with that much power and that much speed was incredible.

'The weather hasn't been great this year, but you can't help that.'

The Band of the Parachute Regiment performing in a stand of the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show

The Band of the Parachute Regiment performing in a stand of the Grand Ring at the Royal Norfolk Show. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

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