Tears as Daisy from East Winch smashes superhero challenge

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason - Credit: Lucy Mason

A quadriplegic six-year-old showed she's a superhero when she tackled a triathlon.

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason - Credit: Lucy Mason

Daisy Mason from East Winch, near King's Lynn, was diagnosed with cerebral palsy after being born 12 weeks early.

The condition means she needs a wheelchair because she has difficulty controlling her muscles or walking unaided.

Daisy and her family entered the Superhero Series, a disability sporting event which welcomes everyone at Windsor, Berks.

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason

Daisy at the superhro triathlon. Photo: Lucy Mason - Credit: Lucy Mason

And with some help from her dad Adam and plenty of cheers from mum Lucy, she well and truly smashed it, bringing tears to spectators' eyes.


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After arriving home, Mrs Mason said: 'The superhero series triathlon was an absolute success. Daisy was amazing and really enjoyed every moment.'

Daisy had a slight wobble when she got into the lake and felt how cold the water in it was.

Daisy Mason (6) and her dad Adam are taking part in a Superhero Series triathlon this weekend at Dor

Daisy Mason (6) and her dad Adam are taking part in a Superhero Series triathlon this weekend at Dorney Lake in Windsor. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

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Then she started to kick her legs and was soon helping her dad around the course.

'We got her out of the water and out of her wet suit as quickly as we could,' said Mrs Mason.

'We strapped her onto her trike and she cycled the 3k distance dressed as Supergirl.

'The last part of the course was a 1K run. Daisy's daddy pushed her wheelchair 900m and Daisy pushed her self the final 100m over the finish line.'

It took Daisy about 15 minutes to get over the line. But the crowd got behind her as she drew close to completing the course, greeted her lots of cheers and chanting her name.

'She was so happy with herself she threw her arms up in the air and then the emotions got the better of her and she burst into tears,' said Mrs Mason.

'In fact, I think everybody burst into tears. It was one of the proudest moments of my life.

'My little girl is an absolute inspiration. I learn so much from her every day and I feel blessed and lucky to be able to call her my daughter.'

Sarah Wealleans, a solicitor with the law firm Irwin Mitchell, one of the event's sponsors, said: 'Daisy is an inspiration to everyone.'

The firm runs the Don't Quit, Do It campaign to raise awareness of the benefits of disabled sports.

It says that taking part can help people with their rehabilitation and recovery from injuries and also help people realise their potential in spite of any restrictions they may face.

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