Surge in sick dogs dumped

Soaring numbers of sick dogs are being abandoned on the streets of Norwich, with fears families short of cash in the recession are dumping their pets rather than paying to get them treated.

Soaring numbers of sick dogs are being abandoned on the streets of Norwich, with fears families short of cash in the recession are dumping their pets rather than paying to get them treated.

The city council picks up around 300 stray dogs a year and they, plus charities which look after animals, say the number with medical problems is on the up.

It is believed that, given many people are pushed for cash because of the recession, they are choosing to abandon their animals rather than risk running up vet's bills. But those people were today criticised for abdicating responsibility for their dogs and were instead urged to seek out help rather than leaving their pets to fend for themselves.

New figures from Norwich City Council revealed that 326 dogs were picked up in Norwich between the end of March last year and the beginning of April this year and the council's dog wardens say they have noticed more of the animals they pick up have medical problems.


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A spokeswoman for Norwich City Council said: 'We deal with around 300 stray dogs each year. While we haven't noticed a significant rise over the last couple of years, we have been seeing more animals with medical problems being abandoned.

'We would urge people who are finding it hard to cope with a pet to contact those that can offer help, rather than just dump animals and leave them to fend for themselves.'

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Earlier this week staff at the Dogs Trust in Snetterton discovered a four-year-old Collie tied up to the gate of its rehoming centre.

Diane McLelland-Taylor, rehoming centre manager at the Dogs Trust, said: 'We were so sad to see this beautiful dog tied up to our gate. He is a good dog and didn't deserve to be abandoned in such a cruel way.

'We will of course do our best to find him the most suitable and loving home for his needs. Staff have already named him Luther and will make sure that he settles in with the rest of the canine residents at Dogs Trust Snetterton.'

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