Artist to showcase exhibition of painted pandemic 'diary'

Sue Vaughan-Williams will be holding her exhibition 'Altered Horizons - Which Way From Here?' from Saturday, August 14.

Sue Vaughan-Williams will be holding her exhibition 'Altered Horizons - Which Way From Here?' from Saturday, August 14 to August 21 at West Acre Gallery in north west Norfolk. - Credit: Sue Vaughan-Williams

An artist whose paintings draw influence from her work with people with trauma and illness will be opening her painted pandemic 'diary' exhibition this weekend.

Sue Vaughan-Williams will be holding her exhibition 'Altered Horizons - Which Way From Here?' from Saturday, August 14 to August 21 at West Acre Gallery in north west Norfolk.

The contemporary artist and writer said the exhibition which considers "change and hope" is her painted diary of the last months, which documents "fear, fracture, beauty, courage, and confidence."

Sue Vaughan-Williams will be holding her exhibition 'Altered Horizons - Which Way From Here?' from Saturday, August 14.

Sue Vaughan-Williams will be holding her exhibition 'Altered Horizons - Which Way From Here?' from Saturday, August 14 to August 21 at West Acre Gallery in north west Norfolk. - Credit: Sue Vaughan-Williams

She added: "It is my large dollop of colour and optimism for the starting block of an improved world."

Ms Vaughan-Williams trained at St Martins School of Art before moving into visual merchandising, and has spent several years as display and exhibition designer for Christian Dior.


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She later worked with organisations supporting people with disabilities and life-altering conditions, which helped kick start a family interiors studio and online gallery, working with a 'unique style' with oil paint.

She said: "My creative practice comes from an inner space of imaginations and thought, with elements of the natural and man-made landscapes above and beneath me.

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"From my work with people whose life had been seismically shifted by trauma or illness, I learned how to see things from a very different perspective."

The artist questions what lessons people have been learned from Covid-19 and what changes need to be made to "ensure a safe planet for generations to come."

She said: "We have been marked in enormous or small ways by the beast named Covid.

"Loss, grief, and time to really think about how we are and where we are, has given and taken.

"As we journey out of this bad dream, so we must now look climate change squarely in the eye.

"Covid made me look at the changes to the landscape that I walked every day. The magic of nature in minute detail and its critical importance to the greater picture.

"Behind our closed doors, I saw new kindness and ingenuity, love, and care. We need to hold all those things, and use them to squash ignorance and greed, for us all to go forward with hope."

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