Search

Stunning images capturing the work of Humphry Repton to go on show at Sheringham park

PUBLISHED: 12:21 23 March 2018 | UPDATED: 12:43 23 March 2018

International Garden Photographer of the Year competition winner The Last Rays of Sun, by Simon Lea. The photograph, which shows Warley Woods, in the West Midlands, will be on show at Sheringham Park as part of a celebration of the life of Humphry Repton. Photo: Simon Lea

International Garden Photographer of the Year competition winner The Last Rays of Sun, by Simon Lea. The photograph, which shows Warley Woods, in the West Midlands, will be on show at Sheringham Park as part of a celebration of the life of Humphry Repton. Photo: Simon Lea

Archant

The 200th anniversary of the death of landscape designer Humphry Repton will be marked at Sheringham Park, with an exhibition of photographs of some of his greatest creations.

A design from one of Repton's famous 'Red Books', showing Sheringham Park with some country walkers and an artist seated at his easel. Photo: National TrustA design from one of Repton's famous 'Red Books', showing Sheringham Park with some country walkers and an artist seated at his easel. Photo: National Trust

Born in Bury St Edmunds in 1752, Repton attended Norwich Grammar School and after working in the textile industry, moved to Sustead, near Aylsham.

Stints as journalist, artist and dramatist followed, but, after he became secretary to William Windham of Felbrigg Hall, he began studying botany, eventually coining the phrase ‘landscape gardener’ and succeeding Capability Brown as the greatest landscape designer of the eighteenth century.

Humphry Repton's favourite project, Sheringham Park. Photo: National Trust Images/Justin MinnsHumphry Repton's favourite project, Sheringham Park. Photo: National Trust Images/Justin Minns

His first commission – Catton Park, Norwich, in 1788 - was followed by more than 400 projects, including gardens at Wanstead Park and Russell Square in London, Woburn Abbey and, what is regarded as the best example of his work and his own personal favourite project, Sheringham Park.

Comprising 1,000 acres of varied habitat including wild garden, woodland, parkland and clifftop, the historic site was designed for the Upcher family in 1812.

View from The Temple towards Sheringham Hall and the sea in Sheringham Park. Photo: National Trust images/Rod EdwardsView from The Temple towards Sheringham Hall and the sea in Sheringham Park. Photo: National Trust images/Rod Edwards

It is now in the care of the National Trust and welcomes nearly 270,000 visitors a year.

To celebrate his life and work, the conservation charity has teamed up with the prestigious International Garden Photographer of the Year competition, which this year includes a special category dedicated to Repton’s landscapes.

The winning image, taken at Warley Woods, in the West Midlands, by Simon Lea and entitled The Last Rays of Sun, will be on show alongside other competition entries at Sheringham Park from September 1 as part of a series of events marking the anniversary of Repton’s death.

These include guided walks, a lecture and a living history weekend, as well as a end-of-year light show.

Malcolm Fisher, who is visitor experience manager at the much-loved site, said he thought that as an artist himself, Repton would have been pleased to see his work captured on camera.

He added: “We were delighted to see so many entries showcasing the work of such an important figure in British landscape history and we are looking forward to seeing the winning images on display.”

For more information, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sheringhampark



Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists