Students’ artworks capture wide range of social issues in biggest-ever exhibition of its kind

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, studies a light box installation of

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, studies a light box installation of cancer cells by Leo White. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Everything from fashion to fine art, photography, games and moving images have gone on show as part of the biggest exhibition of postgraduate art ever to be held in Norwich.

MA students work on show at NUA. Vice Chancellor John Last with large photographs by MA photography

MA students work on show at NUA. Vice Chancellor John Last with large photographs by MA photography student Danyelle Farrell, called Ithaca. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

The work of more than 70 MA students from Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) has gone on display at the Guntons Building in St Georges Street as part of the event, which opened today (Thursday, August 31) and runs until September 6.

The work explores a broad range of social issues in different media - from cutting fashion patterns in a way that minimises waste fabric, to a collaboration with the Alzheimer's Society and Medical Research Council on an unsettling animation that tries to capture the perspective of people with the disease.

Professor John Last, NUA's vice chancellor, said: 'One of the most striking features of this year's show is that this is art and creativity with something to say about the world.

'You'll find here students exploring a range of contemporary – and perennial – social issues and questions: gender identity, environmental issues, climate change and homelessness, to note but a few.

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, with textile design by Mark Mann, wh

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, with textile design by Mark Mann, which includes a bronze cast of a urinal, which was cast in the university's foundry. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017


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'Of course, students are right to explore social and ethical issues. After all, this is the world they've inherited.

'This year, I've been delighted to award eight commendations – and also a Vice-Chancellor's Prize for one of the most ambitious projects we've seen: spanning textiles to bronze.'

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Marie Brennan, associate dean, head of taught postgraduate awards, said: 'This year's show is our biggest to date and explores a broad range of ideas and techniques across different media.

'Visitors to the show will see a growing confidence reflected in our MA students' work across all eight postgraduate courses, from fine art and fashion, to games and photography – and including curation for the first time.

MA students work on show at NUA. Mark Mann's bronze cast of a urinal, which was cast in the universi

MA students work on show at NUA. Mark Mann's bronze cast of a urinal, which was cast in the university's foundry. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

'The MA Show is the culmination of months of creative exploration and endeavour and the students should be proud of their work and what they have achieved.'

Admission to the show is free. For more information and to see a 360-degree video of the works on display, visit www.nua.ac.uk/ma-degree-show-2017

MA students work on show at NUA. Vice Chancellor, John Last, and Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, stud

MA students work on show at NUA. Vice Chancellor, John Last, and Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, study Zero Waste Fashion by Hannamari Markkula. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, with student Amy Ollett's design for

MA students work on show at NUA. Associate Dean, Marie Brennan, with student Amy Ollett's design for dance. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

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