Search

‘Just overwhelmed by the kindness’ - Stephen Fry thanks well wishers after revealing cancer diagnosis

PUBLISHED: 09:19 25 February 2018 | UPDATED: 09:19 25 February 2018

Stephen Fry pictured in Swaffham in 2015. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Stephen Fry pictured in Swaffham in 2015. Picture: Matthew Usher.

© ARCHANT NORFOLK 2015

Stephen Fry has thanked people for their messages of support after he announced he had undergone surgery for prostate cancer.

The 60-year-old tweeted on Saturday night: “Just overwhelmed by the kindness of so many of you. It means the world to me. Intensely aware of how lucky I am. Thank you, thank you xxx.”

The broadcaster announced on Friday that he had his prostate removed in January and that “it all seemed to go pretty well”.

He announced the diagnosis, which came in December, in a video on his website.

“They took the prostate out, they took 11 lymph nodes out, the various bits that were taken out were examined and it turned out I had a Gleason Score of nine. After considering 10 is the maximum, it was clearly an aggressive little bugger,” he said.

Fry also urged older men to get tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, which can be indicative of complications.

“I generally felt my life was saved by this early intervention, so I would urge any of you men of a certain age to get your PSA levels checked,” he said.

Prostate Cancer UK praised Fry for “speaking about his personal experience” because “awareness like this is so important”.

The charity’s chief executive, Angela Culhane, said: “We salute Stephen for his courage in speaking out about his personal experience and wish him all the very best for his recovery.

“It is crucial for every man to acknowledge the threat that prostate cancer can pose to his life.

“Some men in particular face a higher than average risk and so if you are over 50, black, or have a family history of prostate cancer, it’s important that you speak to your GP about the disease.”

There are around 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year, but it usually develops slowly so may show no symptoms for many years.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press