Southwold schoolchildren enjoy tasty tradition

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St Edmunds day. - Credit: Nick Butcher

Pupils tucked into tasty treats as they revived an old tradition.

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St Edmunds day. - Credit: Nick Butcher

In Southwold, the St Edmund's Day celebrations on November 20 of issuing sticky buns to the town's schoolchildren is an ancient one.

And on Friday, last week, 75 pupils from Southwold Primary School continued this tradition by participating in a church service, which saw the youngsters dressing up to tell the tale of St Edmund, as well as enjoying sticky buns – courtesy of Two Magpies Bakery, Southwold.

The Rev Simon Pitcher, of St Edmunds Church – who conducted the service – said: 'Every year town councillors, the bellman, pupils from the school and parents come to enjoy a service. The children enjoyed it and their parents joined in with the actions as well and there were plenty of smiles on faces.

'It's important to remember the story of King Edmund as it reminds us of the importance of courage, loyalty and faithfulness.' Ruth Nixon, headteacher at Southwold Primary School, said: 'It's a really good tradition and it's important for the children to learn about their local heritage and community. I think its important they experience a visit to church so they understand the occasion and the sense of occasion.'

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St

Youngsters from Southwold primary school receive a sticky bun from the town council to celebrate St Edmunds day. - Credit: Nick Butcher


You may also want to watch:


The story of St Edmund is one steeped in myth, he was crowned King of the East Angles in 855AD. However 14 years later he attempted to repel a invasion by Vikings. His army was defeated and he was killed – how and when is unknown, but the legend recorded by Abbot of Fleury in his Life of St Edmund, tells of his torture and martyrdom.

The legend states Edmund was taken prisoner, whipped and tied to a tree and when he refused to renounce his faith he was shot with arrows and beheaded.

Most Read

Later his supporters searched for the missing head and were alerted to its location by the sound of Edmund's voice calling, they found the head guarded by a wolf.

The church in Southwold now bears his name and the emblem of Southwold Primary School includes the Arms of St Edmund.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus