Service held at Wymondham Abbey to mark Anzac Day and sacrifices at Gallipoli

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Pictured is Warrant Office Class Two

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Pictured is Warrant Office Class Two Matthew Mancini reading from the book of wisdom. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

They came from the other side of the world to fight during the First World War, enduring terrible conditions far away from home.

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Picture: Ian Burt

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

But now, the members of The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (Anzacs) who lost their lives in the 1915 Gallipoli campaign and those who have been injured, lost or killed in subsequent conflicts and campaigns have been remembered in a special service held at Wymondham Abbey.

Organised by the Norfolk branch of the British Australia Society to mark Anzac day on April 25.

The message from Sunday's service, led by Revd Catherine Relf-Pennington, was of building lasting international friendships from conflict.

The service was attended by Australian nationals who have made their home in Norfolk, as well as families and relatives of those who had fought in the battle of Gallipoli.

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Picture: Ian Burt

A service to commemorate Anzac Day was held at Wymondham Abbey. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt


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The service was also attended by Marion Maxwell, Lord Mayor of Norwich, the Lord-lieutenant of Norfolk, Richard Jewson, representatives from the Australian and New Zealand High Commissions and Mr Cem Isik, The Deputy Head of Mission, Turkish Embassy.

Mr Isik read the words that Mustafa Kemal Ataturk made to visitors from Britain, Australia and New Zealand to Turkey in 1934.

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Richard Robbins, the chairman of the Norfolk branch of the British Australia society, highlighted the importance of remembering the sacrifice made by the Anzac forces: 'Out of every five people in this country, three will have some sort of connection with Australia. Although the loss of life in battle of Gallipoli was small in comparison to other battles, it affected a huge number of Australians.'

Mr Isik it was a pleasure for a representative from the Turkish Embassy to be invited to the service.

'The war was a tremendous loss of life but from that came long-lasting friendship.

'I'm thinking of the words our first president said to the mothers of soldiers who died at Gallipoli which were important in terms of reconciliation. That friendship continues today.'

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