Bomb team called to Thetford Forest after discovery of Second World War mortar

A bomb disposal team were called to Thetford Forest after a walker discovered an unexploded mortar b

A bomb disposal team were called to Thetford Forest after a walker discovered an unexploded mortar bomb from the second world war. Photo: Christopher Taylor - Credit: Christopher Taylor

A bomb disposal team were called to Thetford Forest after a walker discovered an unexploded mortar from the Second World War.

Christopher Taylor, from Mildenhall, was walking in Thetford Forest, near the Icknield Way trail, on Saturday, October 24, when he discovered what he believed to be a mortar bomb.

The 79-year-old said he often “walks off the beaten track”, but was not expecting to find an explosive.

He said: “Not everybody gets off the beaten track but I do on a regular basis because I like to follow deer tracks.

“It takes you to different and interesting places in the wood and you discover new things, but not usually anything that will blow up.


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“I knew what it was, but you don’t know how stable these things are, if it was used or if it was still live.

“If someone had kicked it or tried to move it, it could have been fatal.”

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After discovering the bomb, Mr Taylor alerted the police and a bomb disposal team, from Colchester troop, 621 squadron, 11 explosive ordnance disposal regiment royal logistic corps, was called out to the forest.

An Army spokesman said: “The alarm had been raised after a suspected item of munition was found by a member of the public. On inspection, it was found to be a Second World War exercise mortar and was destroyed in situ.

“We would encourage the public to raise the alarm if they do have concerns about any suspect items they find and not to touch them. It is better to be safe than sorry.”

Mr Taylor added: “It’s essential people are aware these things are about and do not to touch them if they find anything that looks remotely military.

“Apparently, the area was used during and after the Second World War. There is probably other stuff lying around.

“I was able to meet up with a PC and I guided her to the site which was taped off.

“Unfortunately, I didn’t see the final result but she did ring me later to confirm that it was a mortar bomb and the bomb disposal team had blown it up.”

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