RSPCA left shocked by poorly parrotlets and ensnared dog

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after a pair of parrots were left in a cage too small for them.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after a pair of parrots were left in a cage too small for them. - Credit: RSPCA West Norfolk

The RSPCA says it was "shocked" after being called upon to look after a pair of parrotlets who began to pluck at each other's feathers due to being stuck in a cage too small for them and a dog who lost a leg after becoming ensnared in a trap.

RSPCA West Norfolk took in the parrotlets on September 7, with almost all of their feathers plucked off after they began to panic in the small cage, while the dog arrived on August 29, after she caught her hind leg in a wire snare trap, forcing vets to amputate.

The parrotlets were passed on to a friend after their owner died and while she did her best to help them, it was not enough as they became stressed and began to pluck at each other.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after a pair of parrots were left in a cage too small for them.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after a pair of parrots were left in a cage too small for them. - Credit: RSPCA West Norfolk

An RSPCA spokesman said: "In many years of animal rescue you feel nothing will shock you anymore and then you get an intake that just breaks your heart. 

"Their owner died and they were past onto a lady who has tried her best for them but sadly it wasn't enough, these parrotlets were living in a cage that was too small for a fly, let alone two birds."


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Once the birds arrived in the care of the RSPCA they moved them to a large cage where teams say they began their road to recovery saying they hoped the animals would flourish with the right care.

Daisy the dog was found caught in the trap in a field in Downham Market by two members of the public who raced her to London Road vets in King's Lynn, where staff were unable to trace her owner as her microchip was registered with the breeder who was not contactable.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after Daisy the dog became ensnared after being abandoned.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after Daisy the dog became ensnared after being abandoned. - Credit: RSPCA West Norfolk

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The prognosis was not good for the leg, with RSPCA vets advised to amputate, when they began to operate they found wood shavings in her fur and it became clear from her body she had been used for breeding and dumped.

However, Daisy has a brighter future after one of the branch's dog walkers fell in love with her and decided to adopt her.

Carl Saunders, RSPCA West Norfolk manager, said: "Daisy has the most amazing temperament and that is what is so heartbreaking about it all, because even with what she's been through she is just the most wonderful dog."

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after Daisy the dog became ensnared after being abandoned.

RSPCA West Norfolk were shocked after Daisy the dog became ensnared after being abandoned. - Credit: RSPCA West Norfolk


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