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Hundreds take part in Catton Park run to raise money for Stroke Association

PUBLISHED: 18:49 24 March 2019 | UPDATED: 18:50 24 March 2019

Hundreds of runners turned out at Catton park in Norwich for the Resolutuion Run for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Hundreds of runners turned out at Catton park in Norwich for the Resolutuion Run for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil Didsbury

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Runners in Norwich joined thousands of people across the country taking part in 5k and 10k runs to raise money to help those whose lives have been affected by strokes.

EDP reporter Peter Walsh who suffered a stroke in 2018 took part in the Resolution Run at Catton park. Picture: Neil DidsburyEDP reporter Peter Walsh who suffered a stroke in 2018 took part in the Resolution Run at Catton park. Picture: Neil Didsbury

The Resolution Run, at Catton Park in Norwich, was one of 34 events taking place across the country in support of the Stroke Association.

Hundreds of people took to the start line at the park in Old Catton to run 5k or 10k.

Some of the participants had suffered strokes themselves, while others were running in memory of loved ones who have gone through the trauma of suffering a stroke.

EDP reporter Peter Walsh who suffered a stroke in 2018 took part in the Resolution Run at Catton park. Picture: Neil DidsburyEDP reporter Peter Walsh who suffered a stroke in 2018 took part in the Resolution Run at Catton park. Picture: Neil Didsbury

The event raised funds for vital research and to support people affected by stroke in the east of England.

Joanna McGuinness, from the Stroke Association, said: “Stroke can affect anyone of any age – young children, it can affect young adults all the way up to elderly people and it can change lives in a matter of seconds. So that’s why events like this are so important because we want to really raise awareness as well as the funds.”

A stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is cut off, caused by a clot or bleeding in the brain.

Chris Bean, head of neurosciences development at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) said: “I think the first thing is coming to terms with having had one.

Chris Bean, Head of Neurosciences Development at the Norfolk & Norwich hospital took part in the run to raise funds and awareness for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil DidsburyChris Bean, Head of Neurosciences Development at the Norfolk & Norwich hospital took part in the run to raise funds and awareness for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil Didsbury

“A lot of the time people think this is something that just happens to older people, to grandparents and great grandparents, and that isn’t the case at all. That’s one of the first things and then its that road to recovery – getting back to, ideally, how you were before the stroke.”

Claire Bullard was taking part in her first running event after her mother suffered two strokes in 18 months. She said it had been “very, very sad” and had seen the family completely have to change their view of her mother from someone who helped them to someone who now had to be helped.

She said she thought the event was going to be “emotional”.

Hundreds of runners turned out at Catton park in Norwich for the Resolutuion Run for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil DidsburyHundreds of runners turned out at Catton park in Norwich for the Resolutuion Run for the Stroke Association. Picture: Neil Didsbury

I ran to help give others a second chance after a stroke like me

A year ago I had never even thought about a stroke. Why would I? I was a seemingly fighting fit 41-year-old father-of-three and keen runner who, less than a year earlier, had run a sub 3hr 45min marathon at Loch Ness.

Bottles of water and first aiders were on hand for the Resolutuion runners at Catton park in Norwich. Picture: Neil DidsburyBottles of water and first aiders were on hand for the Resolutuion runners at Catton park in Norwich. Picture: Neil Didsbury

But one morning last March a crushing headache proved to be the start of a new, uncharted chapter.

Two days in hospital was followed by about 13 weeks off work recovering with therapy to try and improve my memory and tests to determine why my stroke occurred.

The amazing love and support of my wife, children and other family and friends together with countless messages from work colleagues helped no end.

I am now medicated but I have been given a second chance and that is why I ran today, to help others looking for second chances of their own after a stroke.

Peter Walsh

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