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Father and son rescued as they clung to groyne

PUBLISHED: 10:53 25 August 2020 | UPDATED: 18:20 25 August 2020

Pete Revell, Bacton Coastguard rescue officer. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Pete Revell, Bacton Coastguard rescue officer. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Archant

A father was plucked from the sea after wading in to try to save his son, who was in trouble in rough weather.

One of the RNLI lifeguards at Mundesley beach went out on his board to rescue a father and son. Picture: Bacton CoastguardOne of the RNLI lifeguards at Mundesley beach went out on his board to rescue a father and son. Picture: Bacton Coastguard

One of the RNLI lifeguards at Mundesley beach went out on his board to bring the father and son to safety, after they had made their way onto the end of a rocky groyne.

Pete Revell, rescue officer from the Coastguard’s Bacton team, said they and the Mundesley Independent Lifeboat were also called to the scene at the time of the rescue, just after 2pm on Monday, August 24.

Mr Revell said: “The sea started to get really rough. There was a child that got taken by the waves, his father went out to rescue him and they were able to climb onto the end of one of the groynes.

“A member of the public spotted them and alerted the emergency services and the lifeguard at the same time. The RNLI lifeguard jumped on his board and went out to get them.”

Mr Revell said the father, son and lifeguard all had minor cuts and bruises from the rocks, but were otherwise unharmed and no ambulance was required.

The lifeguards on duty were Jack Griffin and Charlie Payne.

Mr Revell said the Coastguard was later called out to two people, who found themselves stranded on a reef with the tide coming in around them at Sea Palling. He said they were helped off the reef by Sea Palling Independent Lifeboat.

He said it had been an extremely busy summer for Norfolk’s Coastguard, and the Bacton team had already been called out to more than 100 jobs - more than last year’s total of 86.

Mr Revell said: “It’s unprecedented. We’ve never known it this busy, and it’s no different from the teams in Hunstanton, Wells, Cromer, they’re all experiencing a high amount of calls.

“But it’s lovely to see the beaches being used to their full potential as well.”

Mr Revell said that while the next few days were forecast to be cooler and there may be fewer people swimming in the sea, the change in the weather brought its own challenges.

He said: “There are a lot of visitors in Norfolk at the moment who are not used to our environment, it might be the first time they’ve experienced our coastline.

“Please remember not to go near the cliff edges in windy weather. There could also be a lot of high seas and big waves.”


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