Residents at risk of burns, scalding and from intruders, report into Lyles House at Hindolveston finds

Inspectors who visited a care home in Hindolveston, near Fakenham, found that the safety of resident

Inspectors who visited a care home in Hindolveston, near Fakenham, found that the safety of residents was not being adequately considered. Picture John Stillwell/PA Wire - Credit: PA

Inspectors who visited a care home in Hindolveston, near Fakenham, found that the safety of residents was not being adequately considered and said it was leaving them at risk from burns, scalds and potential intruders.

The unannounced inspection of Lyles House, which houses up to 20 residents, was conducted by the independent regulator, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), on March 1.

It raised a number of serious safety concerns, with one of the most serious being related to fire safety. Inspectors noted that night shifts were staffed by only one member of staff and they would be unlikely to be able to deal with a fire on their own.

They added that two people who lived in the home were confined to their beds and a completed personal evacuation plan stated that more than one staff member would be needed to help them in the event of an evacuation.

The regulator deemed this to be a breach of the Health and Social Care Act and referred it to the fire service.

Other concerns related to the risk of burns and scalds, with radiators found to be too hot and a bathroom cupboard that contains a hot water tank and hot copper water pipes, unlocked and easily accessible.

Furthermore, the home was found to be vulnerable to intruders due to the front door of the premises being left unlocked. While staff said this was closely monitored, inspectors were able to enter the building unchallenged and make their way to an area that was close to people's rooms.

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The combination of problems lowered the care home's ranking in both the safety and the leadership categories and gave it an overall rating of 'in need of improvement'.

However, in the effectiveness, responsiveness and caring categories it received positive ratings, and the CQC noted that the families of residents had praised the care that was being provided. It also found that the home had adopted an open culture where care suggestions from residents and relatives are listened to and respected.

Since the report's publication the regulator confirmed that improvements were being made in some areas, with the policy of an unlocked front door being reviewed and action being taken to reduce the risk of burns from hot radiators.

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