Recipe: ‘Walnut Whip’ ice cream

Charlotte Smith Jarvis's home made ice cream.
Walnut Whip Ice Cream.

Charlotte Smith Jarvis's home made ice cream. Walnut Whip Ice Cream. - Credit: Archant

Make our Walnut Whip ice cream - inspired by the classic chocolate treat.

Who doesn't love a Walnut Whip? Ok, so if you're allergic to nuts they're probably not going to appeal. But I just adore them. I remember as a kid it being a real treat for mum to buy me one from the local corner shop. The same way as there's a method to eating a bourbon biscuit (nibble the edges, eat the top, eat the bottom, save the cream for last) and a Jaffa cake (much the same) there is an art to the delectation of a classic Whirl.

First you have to take the walnut off and give it to your mum (I do eat it myself these days but I used to turn my nose up at that bit).

Next take one small bite off the top and eat the chocolate. Then, you have to excavate all the mallow out of the centre with your tongue, before popping the empty chocolate shell in your mouth. Bliss, right?

I had a bit of a penchant for the coffee-flavoured ones, which have sadly since demised (although M&S do a decentish cappuccino version).


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In this creamy, show-stopping ice cream I wanted to capture the essence of the elegant chocolate favourite. Walnut ice cream is swirled with sticky plump marshmallow and a dark chocolate sauce that remains soft (thanks to the addition of golden syrup). It really is a stunner, and perfect for making an impression this summer when you have people over for dinner.

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'Walnut Whip' ice cream

(makes about 1 pint)

Ingredients

For the mallow: 6 leaves gelatine, 2 large egg whites, 1tbsp golden syrup, 350g caster sugar, 1tsp vanilla extract

For the chocolate sauce: 100g dark chocolate, 25g unsalted butter, 90ml single cream, 2tbsps golden syrup

For the candied walnuts: 100g chopped walnuts, 100g caster sugar

For the ice cream: 115g walnuts, 4 egg yolks, 100g caster sugar, 1tsp cornflour, 300ml whole milk, 300ml whipping or double cream

Method

Make the candied walnuts. Place the sugar and nuts in a pan over a medium to low heat with a splash of water. Allow the sugar to melt completely then turn the heat up until it turns a nice amber colour. Toss the walnuts to coat and remove to a tray lined with greaseproof paper.

For the chocolate sauce put all the sauce ingredients in a small pan, melt together and set aside in a bowl.

For the marshmallow soak the gelatine in cold water for 10 minutes. Put the sugar in a large pan with a splash of water. Melt on a low heat until all sugar crystals are gone then bring to the boil and take to 120C on a sugar thermometer (soft ball stage).

While the sugar cooks whisk the egg whites to soft peaks. Strain the gelatine and vanilla into the sugar when it reaches the right heat and pour in a stream over the whisked eggs, whisking with an electric whisk until very very stiff and completely cold (it will take a while).

Remove a quarter of the mix for your ice cream. The rest can be flavoured as you like and poured into a lined tin to set for enjoying later!

To make the ice cream warm the walnuts in the oven for a few minutes then finely grind to a paste in a spice mill or food processor. Mix the egg yolks and sugar and cornflour in a large bowl. Warm the milk in a pan with the ground walnuts and simmer gently. Pour over the egg yolk mixture and whisk. Pour the whole lot back into the pan and whisk until thick on a low heat. Allow to cool.

Whip the cream and fold into the cooled ice cream custard base. Churn in an ice cream machine, or freeze in a tub, whisking with a fork every half an hour.

When the ice cream is nearly frozen, crush the candied walnuts and stir through with the chocolate sauce and spoons of marshmallow.

Devour.

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