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Pupils' progress on Fairtrade

PUBLISHED: 20:55 19 June 2006 | UPDATED: 11:03 22 October 2010

RICHARD BALLS

Pupils at a Norfolk high school put International Development Secretary Hilary Benn through his paces today when he returned to see the progress they had made with their Fairtrade tuck shop.

Pupils at a Norfolk high school put International Development Secretary Hilary Benn through his paces today when he returned to see the progress they had made with their Fairtrade tuck shop.

The Cabinet minister munched on Fairfrade chocolate biscuits with sixth-form pupils at the Hewett School in Norwich while fielding questions on developing world issues, ranging from the supply of water in drought-stricken countries to the spread of Aids.

Accompanied by MEP Richard Howitt, Labour's European spokesman on foreign affairs, his return to the school came a year after students impressed him with their Enterprise project, for which they decided to run a tuck shop selling Fairtrade products on Mondays and Fridays.

Last week, Mr Benn met school-children in Liverpool as part of the Cocoa Summits, a series of events making the connection between the chocolate we buy and the problems facing cocoa farmers in the developing world.

Mr Benn was delighted with the work city pupils had put into promoting Fairtrade and was particularly interested to talk to one pupil planning to spend six months teaching in Botswana and another who is bound for India.

“I was really impressed when I came here a year ago,” he said afterwards.

“I met a larger group, and it was not just the fact that they were doing the work on Fairtrade but that they asked some really good questions. I remembered that, and, when the chance came to follow it up, I jumped at it.

“I am really impressed to see what they have done and also at how it has influenced what they are doing in their gap years.”


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