Pupils get a lesson in Stone Age survival at Wheatfen

Surlingham Primary School pupils visit Wheatfen Nature Reserve.Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Surlingham Primary School pupils visit Wheatfen Nature Reserve.Picture: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

It is one of the most treasured parts of the county renowned for its exquisite natural history.

Surlingham Primary School pupils visit Wheatfen Nature Reserve. Evie pictured with a stone age flint

Surlingham Primary School pupils visit Wheatfen Nature Reserve. Evie pictured with a stone age flint found on the reserve.Picture: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

Now the Wheatfen Nature Reserve – established by renowned naturalist Ted Ellis – has become the focus for a rather unusual study of the region's pre-history.

Pupils from the nearby Surlingham Primary School descended on the site to learn about the Stone Age.

Rose Hoare, 40, the granddaughter of the late Ted Ellis, invited the class for a day of activities at the reserve to tie in with their course work. She said various Stone Age artefacts had been uncovered in nearby fields, including an axe head and other tools.

There was also evidence that the woolly mammoth, hyena, bison and woolly rhinoceros roamed the area thousands of years ago.

It all proved to be a fascinating learning experience for the 19 primary school pupils.

Teacher Rebecca Jackson said: 'The Stone Age can be a bit dry if you have to teach it in the classroom.

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'Learning about fire and how they hunted does not mean much in the classroom.

'But taking them out here brings these things to life. You can only go so far on your imagination without something to stimulate it.'

During the day pupils learned how to track animals by looking at footprints and looking for any food they may have eaten.

The youngsters were also given the opportunity to play a game to test their hunting prowess. Pupil Tommy Hoare, eight, said: 'It was fun, we found out about lots of things and saw lots of birds.

'I don't think I would do very well [in the Stone Age]. I'm a vegetarian and I can't eat meat.'

Have you made a historical find on your land? Call Luke Powell on 01603 772 684.

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